Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program: Headquarters
Education, Research and Technical Assistance for Managing Our Natural Resources

Headquarters News and Information Activities


News Item Date
2019 Year in Review is now available! - The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program - 2019 Year in Review is now available online. Inside you will find brief descriptions of just a few highlighted activities of unit scientists, students, and cooperators in support of our joint mission. 2020-02-13
Nine Assistant Unit Leader Positions are Open! - Mississippi Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Wildlife Biologist/Fish Biologist GS 12/13
5/14/20-6/13/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568256400
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568256200

Virginia Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Wildlife Biologist
5/14/20 - 6/13/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568266200
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568265900

Oklahoma Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568654400
Merit - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568654200

Arizona Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568595600
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568595300

Utah Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568640800
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568640500

Idaho Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568645900
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568645400

Florida Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568658100
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568657700

North Carolina Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/20/19 - 6/19/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568714800
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568714400

Texas Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/20/20 - 6/19/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568718100
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568717900


2020-05-19
Follow CRU on Twitter! - Follow CRU on our twitter account at https://twitter.com/USGSCoopUnits 2015-03-01
All Hands Meeting - Abstracts - Abstracts for the All Hands Meeting Breakout Sessions 2016-03-07
Kate McFadden Memorial - Prof. Katherine (Kate) McFadden, wildlife ecologist and conservation scientist, died on October 28, 2014. She was 41 years old. Kate was the Assistant Unit Leader at the USGS South Carolina Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit and Assistant Professor in the School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences at Clemson University. Kate grew up in Georgia, but traveled extensively for her education and field research. She received her B.A. in Biology from the University of California Santa Cruz, her M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences from Texas A&M University, and her Advanced Certificate in Environmental Policy and her Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Biology from Columbia University in New York. Kate was an NSF Teaching Fellow, a Knauss Postdoctoral Marine Policy Fellow, and a Fulbright Scholar. Prior to arriving at Clemson University Kate also served as Scientific Director for the Environmental Science and MPA Program at Columbia University, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology at Columbia University, and Associate Research Scientist at the American Museum of Natural History. Kate's ecological work always served a strong conservation purpose, and her research took her far and wide, encompassing many species in both the terrestrial and marine realms. Kate loved being in the field. Her projects included field seasons on remote atolls in the Hawaiian Islands, where she worked on the endangered Hawaiian monk seal; on Cozumel Island, where she studied endangered, endemic carnivores; in Rwanda where she surveyed for multiple species of rare wildlife as a Fulbright Scholar; on Palmyra Atoll, where she worked on many aspects of the ecology of green sea turtles; and in the southeastern US, where she and her graduate students were most recently working on American alligators, feral hogs, and black bears. Kate’s contributions to conservation and education are numerous. She was the author of many scientific papers, abstracts, and reports and she was a graduate advisor and teacher to many students at multiple universities. The dedication, commitment, and passion she poured into teaching and mentoring were remarkable and at times seemed boundless. Kate was the mentor for her students we all hope to be. Kate was an inspiration to those of us who knew her – professionally and personally. Kate was a terrific teacher, a dedicated scientist committed to doing excellent work, a generous colleague, a dedicated and competitive athlete, and a caring friend. Kate's enthusiasm for science, her love of the outdoors, nature, and the conservation of species and ecosystems, and her vibrant, loving, personality will continue to influence and motivate us for years to come. Contributed by: Carolyn Kurle (UC – San Diego), Autumn-Lynn Harrison (Clemson University), Patrick Jodice (South Carolina Cooperative Research Unit) 2014-11-21
New Distance Learning Course - PRINCIPLES OF MODELING WITH SPREADSHEETS January - May, 2011; Online Course Description: This course is offered through a partnership between the Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, the US Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, and the US Bureau of Land Management Training Center. The course instructors will be Dr. Anthony Starfield, Dr. Lew Coggins (USFWS NCTC) and Dr. Therese Donovan (USGS Vermont). The course schedule will be similar to a typical university course format with lectures, lab sessions, and instructor office hours occurring weekly from January through May, 2011. Participants will acquire knowledge of the techniques and concepts of modeling for natural resources. The course will be taught as an on-line version of Dr. Anthony Starfield’s Principles of Modeling for Conservation Planning and Analysis course that is taught on the NCTC campus. Session topics include introductions to modeling and spreadsheets, population modeling, decision analysis, ecosystem modeling, and spatially explicit models and their use in making conservation decisions. The course format will consist of weekly lectures and spreadsheet tutorials, followed by group modeling projects that serve as skill checks. The lectures will feature Anthony Starfield and the spreadsheet tutorials will guide students through the model building process for a variety of topics. Office hours will be held on line, and all students will be required to “meet” once per week for a three hour internet-based conference in which groups present their models to the rest of the class. Participants should register for the course in DOI Learn by searching for the course title on the DOILearn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn/index.cfm. Course materials may be previewed at the following website: http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/vtcfwru/spreadsheets/?Page=pom/pom.htm. Who should attend: Biologists and resource managers seeking to broaden their model building skills to inform research and decision making in natural resource management. Participants are not required to be highly skilled in mathematics or computing, although familiarity with spreadsheets and how the results of models can be applied is beneficial. Course Length: Weekly, January – May, 2011 Course Objectives: • Discover how to use models in planning for ecological and conservation biology decisions with defensible results. • Discuss the modeling process, terminology, use of deterministic and stochastic models, what to leave out of a model, scale and resolution, age or state structured models, and how to deal with uncertainty in making conservation decisions. • Learn how to use decision trees, approach decision-analysis under uncertainty, and how to incorporate a pragmatic modeling approach to data collection methods and data analysis. • Learn how to design management-oriented modeling environments using short and long-term data sets, qualitative models, how to address adaptive management, and where GIS can be useful. • Discover how to use simple models for decision-analysis. Contact: Lew Coggins, National Conservation Training Center Email: lew_coggins@fws.gov Phone: 304/876-7436 College Credit: 4 semester hours 2011-01-01