Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program
Education, Research and Technical Assistance for Managing Our Natural Resources

Program News


News Item Date
2019 Year in Review is now available! - The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program - 2019 Year in Review is now available online. Inside you will find brief descriptions of just a few highlighted activities of unit scientists, students, and cooperators in support of our joint mission. 2020-02-13
Nine Assistant Unit Leader Positions are Open! - Mississippi Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Wildlife Biologist/Fish Biologist GS 12/13
5/14/20-6/13/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568256400
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568256200

Virginia Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Wildlife Biologist
5/14/20 - 6/13/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568266200
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568265900

Oklahoma Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568654400
Merit - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568654200

Arizona Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568595600
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568595300

Utah Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568640800
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568640500

Idaho Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568645900
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568645400

Florida Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/19/20 - 6/18/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568658100
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568657700

North Carolina Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/20/19 - 6/19/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568714800
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568714400

Texas Assistant Unit Leader: Research Ecologist/Fish Biologist GS12
5/20/20 - 6/19/20
DEU - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568718100
MP - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/568717900


2020-05-19
Follow CRU on Twitter! - Follow CRU on our twitter account at https://twitter.com/USGSCoopUnits 2015-03-01
All Hands Meeting - Abstracts - Abstracts for the All Hands Meeting Breakout Sessions 2016-03-07
Kate McFadden Memorial - Prof. Katherine (Kate) McFadden, wildlife ecologist and conservation scientist, died on October 28, 2014. She was 41 years old. Kate was the Assistant Unit Leader at the USGS South Carolina Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit and Assistant Professor in the School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences at Clemson University. Kate grew up in Georgia, but traveled extensively for her education and field research. She received her B.A. in Biology from the University of California Santa Cruz, her M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences from Texas A&M University, and her Advanced Certificate in Environmental Policy and her Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Biology from Columbia University in New York. Kate was an NSF Teaching Fellow, a Knauss Postdoctoral Marine Policy Fellow, and a Fulbright Scholar. Prior to arriving at Clemson University Kate also served as Scientific Director for the Environmental Science and MPA Program at Columbia University, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology at Columbia University, and Associate Research Scientist at the American Museum of Natural History. Kate's ecological work always served a strong conservation purpose, and her research took her far and wide, encompassing many species in both the terrestrial and marine realms. Kate loved being in the field. Her projects included field seasons on remote atolls in the Hawaiian Islands, where she worked on the endangered Hawaiian monk seal; on Cozumel Island, where she studied endangered, endemic carnivores; in Rwanda where she surveyed for multiple species of rare wildlife as a Fulbright Scholar; on Palmyra Atoll, where she worked on many aspects of the ecology of green sea turtles; and in the southeastern US, where she and her graduate students were most recently working on American alligators, feral hogs, and black bears. Kate’s contributions to conservation and education are numerous. She was the author of many scientific papers, abstracts, and reports and she was a graduate advisor and teacher to many students at multiple universities. The dedication, commitment, and passion she poured into teaching and mentoring were remarkable and at times seemed boundless. Kate was the mentor for her students we all hope to be. Kate was an inspiration to those of us who knew her – professionally and personally. Kate was a terrific teacher, a dedicated scientist committed to doing excellent work, a generous colleague, a dedicated and competitive athlete, and a caring friend. Kate's enthusiasm for science, her love of the outdoors, nature, and the conservation of species and ecosystems, and her vibrant, loving, personality will continue to influence and motivate us for years to come. Contributed by: Carolyn Kurle (UC – San Diego), Autumn-Lynn Harrison (Clemson University), Patrick Jodice (South Carolina Cooperative Research Unit) 2014-11-21
New Distance Learning Course - PRINCIPLES OF MODELING WITH SPREADSHEETS January - May, 2011; Online Course Description: This course is offered through a partnership between the Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, the US Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, and the US Bureau of Land Management Training Center. The course instructors will be Dr. Anthony Starfield, Dr. Lew Coggins (USFWS NCTC) and Dr. Therese Donovan (USGS Vermont). The course schedule will be similar to a typical university course format with lectures, lab sessions, and instructor office hours occurring weekly from January through May, 2011. Participants will acquire knowledge of the techniques and concepts of modeling for natural resources. The course will be taught as an on-line version of Dr. Anthony Starfield’s Principles of Modeling for Conservation Planning and Analysis course that is taught on the NCTC campus. Session topics include introductions to modeling and spreadsheets, population modeling, decision analysis, ecosystem modeling, and spatially explicit models and their use in making conservation decisions. The course format will consist of weekly lectures and spreadsheet tutorials, followed by group modeling projects that serve as skill checks. The lectures will feature Anthony Starfield and the spreadsheet tutorials will guide students through the model building process for a variety of topics. Office hours will be held on line, and all students will be required to “meet” once per week for a three hour internet-based conference in which groups present their models to the rest of the class. Participants should register for the course in DOI Learn by searching for the course title on the DOILearn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn/index.cfm. Course materials may be previewed at the following website: http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/vtcfwru/spreadsheets/?Page=pom/pom.htm. Who should attend: Biologists and resource managers seeking to broaden their model building skills to inform research and decision making in natural resource management. Participants are not required to be highly skilled in mathematics or computing, although familiarity with spreadsheets and how the results of models can be applied is beneficial. Course Length: Weekly, January – May, 2011 Course Objectives: • Discover how to use models in planning for ecological and conservation biology decisions with defensible results. • Discuss the modeling process, terminology, use of deterministic and stochastic models, what to leave out of a model, scale and resolution, age or state structured models, and how to deal with uncertainty in making conservation decisions. • Learn how to use decision trees, approach decision-analysis under uncertainty, and how to incorporate a pragmatic modeling approach to data collection methods and data analysis. • Learn how to design management-oriented modeling environments using short and long-term data sets, qualitative models, how to address adaptive management, and where GIS can be useful. • Discover how to use simple models for decision-analysis. Contact: Lew Coggins, National Conservation Training Center Email: lew_coggins@fws.gov Phone: 304/876-7436 College Credit: 4 semester hours 2011-01-01
IA Coop Unit updated our Website - The IA Coop Unit has updated our website. It's searchable, easy to manage and update and mobile friendly! Check it out! 2015-05-26
Dave Otis retires as Unit Leader - Dr. Dave Otis officially retired as Unit Leader April 1, 2011. Retirement party will be held Friday, May 6, 2011 on Iowa State Univ. campus, Memorial Union, Campanile Rm. 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Please join us! 2011-05-06
Hiring two Assistant Unit Leader positions - Two U.S Geological Survey research scientist positions are available with the Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (https://www.coopunits.org/Massachusetts/) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The successful candidates will also become adjunct faculty (rank commensurate with experience) in the Department of Environmental Conservation (https://eco.umass.edu/) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

1) Assistant Unit Leader of Wildlife (Wildlife Biologist/Research Ecologist)
12-month Federal Research Scientist at GS-12 or GS-13 level ($85,680 to $132,453)

2) Assistant Unit Leader of Ecology (Research Ecologist)
12-month Federal Research Scientist at GS-12 level ($85,680 to $111,389)

More information, including additional description of the positions, qualifications, and links to the applications are at the link below. Application deadline is 23 April 2020. For additional information, please contact: Dr. Allison Roy, Unit Leader, Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit; aroy@eco.umass.edu.
2020-03-23
Nebraska Wind Energy and Wildlife Project - This website provides information about wind energy development and wildlife in Nebraska and tools that can be used to minimize potential impacts of wind energy development on wildlife. 2019-12-31
Bats across Nebraska - Researchers at the Nebraska Coop Unit are working to understand the decline of bats in Nebraska. They will identify how bats migrate across the landscape, and will quantify bat population trends and habitat use. 2016-02-07
Adaptive Managemetnt Special Issue, Journal of Env. Mgt. - A special issue focused on Adaptive Management was published by the Journal of Environmental Management. Guest editor are Craig R. Allen, Joseph Fontaine, and Kevin L. Pope. The articles are available on line. Search for Journal/Book title “environmental management”, Volume “92”, Issue “5”. 2011-05-01
Nebrasak Invasive Species Newsletter - The Invasive Species Project continues through a federal aid grant from the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, and the Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. The web portal is designed to provide information to the public and private sector on invasive species issues. Information including invasive species biology, monitoring and management methods, actual and potential maps of impact and risk, and invasive species news and events. 2010-12-10
Invasive mussel shows up in Omaha lake - Zorinsky Lake might be drained of most of its water this winter as officials scramble to combat the dreaded zebra mussel. Native to the Caspian Sea, the invasive mussel has wreaked havoc throughout the upper Midwest, causing millions of dollars in damage by clogging power plant and water system pipes, depleting lakes of fish, littering shorelines with glass-like shells and generally disrupting ecosystems. The single zebra mussel discovered on a beer can at Zorinsky on Nov. 9, 2010 has sparked a flurry of action as officials confirmed that the exotic species reached a public Nebraska lake. 2010-11-09
'Sunday Scientist' shines light on otter scat study - In July, 2010, the University of Nebraska State Museum presented a program for children and families that explores what wildlife researchers from UNL's School of Natural Resources and the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission are uncovering about Nebraska's river otters based on samples of their scat. 2010-07-18
2012 Adaptive Management Conference Series hosted by NY Unit - The NY Coop Unit, along with collaborators at Cornell University, will host the annual Adaptive Management Conference Series in Ithaca, NY from June 12-14, 2012. The meeting is an opportunity for individuals working with the challenges of optimal decision making under various forms of uncertainty to discuss new problems, new approaches, and future challenges. 2012-04-12
Recruiting new masters student for January or August 2014 - Dr. McFadden is currently seeking applicants for a doctoral research assistantship at Clemson University. The project will focus on developing innovative tools to assess feral hog habitat damage. Contact Dr. Kate McFadden (kwm6@clemson.edu) for further details 2013-03-01
Three new graduate students join SC CRU - This fall, the SC Unit welcomes two new Masters students (Caroline Poli, Katie Keck) and one new doctoral student (Juliet Lamb). 2012-08-31
South Dakota Coordinating Committee meeting - South Dakota Coordinating Committee Meeting Thursday, October 11, 2018 At the Dakota Nature Park in Brookings, SD RSVP to Jiyoung.kim@sdstate.edu (605.688.4785) 2018-10-11
Unit Scientist Authors New Book - Dr. Clint Boal, Assistant Unit Leader-Wildlife, and colleague Dr. Cheryl Dykstra recently had their edited volume, Urban Raptors: Ecology and Conservation of Birds of Prey in Cities, published by Island Press. 2018-06-12
Texas Unit Undergraduate Wins Poster Competition - Madeleine Thornley, undergraduate assistant in the Texas Cooperative Research Unit, received the award for best undergraduate poster at the 9th Annual Texas Tech Association of Biological Science Symposium. Her poster title was "American Kestrel Food Habits in the Llano Estacado of Texas". 2018-04-07
Texas Unit Fisheries Student Wins Best Student Poster - Emily Richardson, master’s student advised by Reynaldo Patiño, was the 2018 recipient of the Texas Chapter of The Fisheries Society’s Best Student Poster Award for her presentation, “Salinity Adaptation in Golden Alga” 2018-02-09
Texas Unit Wildlife Student Wins Scholarship - Katheryn Watson, doctoral student advised by Clint Boal, was the 2018 recipient of the Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society’s Sam Beasom Memorial Graduate Student Scholarship. 2018-02-09
Unit Scientist Receive Publication Award - David Haukos (UL, Kansas Unit) and Clint Boal (AUL, Texas Unit) received the Texas Chapter of the Wildlife Society’s 2018 Outstanding Publication Award for their book “Ecology and Conservation of Lesser Prairie-Chickens”. 2018-02-09
New Book: Bayesian Statistics for Beginners - The Vermont Coop Unit published a new book, Bayesian Statistics for Beginners: A Step by Step Approach. Authored by Therese Donovan and Ruth Mickey, this book is intended to be a quick and friendly introduction to Bayes' Rule and its many applications. 2019-05-01
New Ebook: R for Fledglings - R is a free, open source software platform that can be used for a variety of tasks, such as data analysis and report writing. The Vermont Unit released a new e-book, R for Fledglings, as a friendly introduction to R and R Studio. 2015-04-09
PhD Fellowship at the University of Vermont – Investigating and Mitigating the Impacts of the Smart Grid on Wildlife - A PhD Fellowship is available for Fall, 2014, through the University of Vermont’s Complex Systems Program to investigate the Smart Grid’s impact on wildlife. The Smart Grid uses modern information technology to make electric power systems work better – cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable. The smart grid is designed to allow greater use of renewable resources, such as solar or wind, which are restricted in traditional grids by high variability and unpredictability of these sources. One fellowship has been allocated to Rubenstein School for Environment and Natural Resources to optimize Smart Grid technology while optimizing wildlife populations as monitored via cell phones that are integrated with a MySQL database. The University of Vermont Smart Grid IGERT bridges in-depth research in engineering, policy and behavior using complex systems theory as an integrating approach. All trainees will complete the Certificate of Graduate Study in Complex Systems at the University of Vermont. Candidates must have a strong quantitative background, including calculus, computer programming skills, and proficiency in using and coding in R. For more information, see http://www.uvm.edu/smartgrid/. The PhD student will work with Rubenstein School faculty members Therese Donovan, Jed Murdoch, and Allan Strong, as well as collaborate with faculty in the UVM Complex Systems program. Interested persons should contact Therese Donovan, Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (tdonovan@uvm.edu). 2014-08-31
New On-Line Short-Course on Structured Decision Making - This course is designed to offer natural resource managers a rational framework and techniques to assist in making smart decisions. 2011-10-01
Principles of Modeling On-Line Course - This January (2012) the Vermont Unit will be offering the on-line course, Principles of Modeling. This course features lectures from world renowned educator and modeler Dr. Tony Starfield; you'll also receive plenty of hands-on modeling training. State and federal cooperators will need to register through DOI Learn; Coop Unit students should contact Terri for more information. 2012-01-15
Principles of Modeling On Line Course Jan - May 2011 - Cooperative Research Unit cooperators are invited to participate in an on line course, Principles of Modeling. This course is offered through a partnership between the Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, the US Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, and the US Bureau of Land Management Training Center. The course instructors will be Dr. Anthony Starfield, Dr. Lew Coggins (USFWS NCTC) and Dr. Therese Donovan (USGS Vermont). The course schedule will be similar to a typical university course format with lectures, lab sessions, and instructor office hours occurring weekly from January through May, 2011. Participants will acquire knowledge of the techniques and concepts of modeling for natural resources.Participants should register for the course in DOI Learn by searching for the course title on the DOILearn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn/index.cfm. 2011-01-01
Monitoring Phenology in the Northeast - Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit students Cori Brauer and Jon Katz presented their on-going research on acoustic monitoring of birds and frogs at a workshop entitled "Integrating Citizen Science into the Scientific Monitoring of Phenology." This woerkshop was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Park Service, and the National Phenology Network. 2010-11-15
International Migratory Bird Day - IMBD was created in 1993 by the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology to focus attention on one of the most spectacular phenomena of the natural world – the annual migration of billions of birds from Latin and South America to breeding grounds in Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. 2010-05-08
TWS Wildlife Field Course at Kehoe Conservation Camp in Castleton, VT - A Wildlife Field Course is being offered through the Northeast Section of the Wildlife Society. The course will be taught at the Kehoe Conservation Camp in Castleton, VT. This course is targeted for undergraduate students majoring in wildlife biology, biology, zoology, forestry, or other natural resource programs in the Northeastern U.S., especially those from programs lacking intense field-based courses. The course is intended to provide students with practical, hands-on training in the tools and techniques of field biology and allow them to apply those skills in a variety of exercises. Students will summarize data from small group projects and present results to the large group and instructors. Practicing biologists from across the region will be engaged as guest instructors for certain workshops and will be invited to lead discussion sessions on current wildlife management issues and lead field trips to demonstrate wildlife and habitat management practices on the ground. 2010-05-16
Hall Sawyer honored for his research contributions in Wyoming - "CHEYENNE – Hall Sawyer, research biologist for Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc. (commonly referred to as WEST, Inc.) has been named recipient of the Excellence in Wildlife Conservation Award given annually by the Wildlife Division of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department.

The Award is designed to recognize government and nongovernment agencies and individuals for exceptional efforts in conservation of Wyoming wildlife and wildlife habitats. Sawyer was recognized for his outstanding contributions to wildlife research and monitoring throughout Wyoming..."
2019-11-11