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CEGL005467 Hecastocleis shockleyi Shrubland

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence:
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Prickleleaf Shrubland
Colloquial Name:
Hierarchy Level: Association
Type Concept: Hecastocleis shockleyi is dominant or codominant in the open shrub layer. This shrubland is also characterized by Atriplex confertifolia, Eriogonum fasciculatum, and Tetradymia axillaris. Other species that are often present include Ephedra viridis, Ericameria laricifolia, and Lepidium fremontii. The emergent tree layer is typically not present, and the herbaceous layer is sparse to open. Herbs that are often present include Achnatherum hymenoides, Bromus rubens, Claytonia perfoliata, Cryptantha utahensis, Delphinium parishii, Gilia spp., Phacelia vallis-mortae, and Poa secunda. Commonly associated nonvascular plants include cryptogamic crust, lichen, and moss. This rare association is currently known only from localized stands in mountains in northern Death Valley, California. It is found primarily on steep, very rocky slopes and bedrock outcrops with northerly aspects. Elevations range from approximately 1250 to 1600 m. Soils are typically calcareous, derived from dolostone (dolomite), limestone and shale, and textures include clay loam, loamy sand, sandy clay.
Diagnostic Characteristics: No Data Available
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: No Data Available
Similar NVC Types:
Physiognomy and Structure: No Data Available
Floristics: Hecastocleis shockleyi is dominant or codominant in the shrub layer. Stands are also characterized by Atriplex confertifolia, Eriogonum fasciculatum, and Tetradymia axillaris. Other species that are often present include Ephedra viridis, Ericameria laricifolia, and Lepidium fremontii. Herbs that are often present include Achnatherum hymenoides, Bromus rubens, Claytonia perfoliata, Cryptantha utahensis, Delphinium parishii, Gilia spp., Phacelia vallis-mortae, and Poa secunda. Commonly associated nonvascular plants include cryptogamic crust, lichen, and moss.
Dynamics: Hecastocleis shockleyi stands are localized in northern Death Valley on nutrient-poor soils such as dolostone and limestone along steep slopes and ridges with colluvial disturbance.
Environmental Description: This shrubland is found primarily on very rocky slopes and bedrock outcrops only at high elevations with northerly aspects. Soils are typically calcareous, derived from sandstone with dolostone (dolomite), limestone and shale, and textures include clay loam, loamy sand, sandy clay.
Geographic Range: The shrubland is localized in mountains in northern Death Valley, California, including the Grapevine Mountains and Last Chance Range.
Nations: US
States/Provinces: CA
US Forest Service Ecoregions (1994/1995)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Intermountain Semi-Desert and Desert Province
Province Code: 341    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Southeastern Great Basin Section
Section Code: 341F     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Confidence Level: Low - Poorly Documented
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: G1
Greasons:
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy: = Hecastocleis shockleyi Shrubland Association (Evens et al. 2014)
Concept Author(s): J.M. Evens et al. (2014)
Author of Description: M.J. Russo after Evens et al. (2014)
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 19Mar2015
References:
  • Evens, J. M., K. Sikes, D. Hastings, and J. Ratchford. 2014. Vegetation alliance descriptions for Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Death Valley National Park and Mojave National Preserve. Unpublished report submitted to USDI National Park Service, Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program. California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, CA. [http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/MOJN/rpts_pubs/rpts_pubs_main.cfm]
  • Thomas, K. A., T. Keeler-Wolf, J. Franklin, and P. Stine. 2004. Mojave Desert Ecosystem Program: Central Mojave vegetation mapping database. U.S. Geological Survey, Western Regional Science Center. 251 pp.
  • Western Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Boulder, CO.