Invalid Unit Specified
Association Detail Report: CEGL007234
Schoenoplectus pungens - Conoclinium betonicifolium - Setaria parviflora - Flaveria brownii Coastal Marsh

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
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Translated Name:Common Threesquare - Betonyleaf Thoroughwort - Marsh Bristlegrass - Brown's Yellowtops Coastal Marsh
Colloquial Name:
This vegetation occurs in interdunal swales and other marshy areas on barrier islands along the south Texas coast. These wetlands are characterized (and may be dominated) by Schoenoplectus pungens, Typha domingensis, Flaveria brownii, Bacopa monnieri, Centella erecta, Phyla nodiflora, and/or Sesbania herbacea. Associated species may include Conoclinium betonicifolium, Setaria parviflora, Andropogon glomeratus, Pluchea odorata var. odorata, and Iva texensis. This provisional community is described from very limited plot data from Padre Island National Seashore, Texas. Some plots attributed to this type were dominated by annuals such as Flaveria brownii and Sesbania herbacea. Classification of these ephemeral ponds and depressions is difficult because of seasonal and weather-related shifts in species composition and dominance.
No Data Available
This community might warrant splitting into separate types but we were not able to discern clear ecological patterns from the cluster analysis. More data will be necessary to discern these patterns if they are relevant. Taken as a whole, these wetlands tend to share a suite of species, but individual occurrences may exhibit strong dominance by different species. Separate types, e.g., one dominated by Schoenoplectus pungens and one dominated by Typha domingensis, are supported by the classification results of other studies of Padre Island and other barrier islands along the Gulf of Mexico (Judd and Lonard 2009). This provisional community is described from very limited plot data from Padre Island National Seashore, Texas. Classification of these ephemeral ponds and depressions is difficult because of seasonal and weather-related shifts in species composition and dominance. This community was described from 12 plots at Padre Island National Seashore that loosely clustered together, but Homoteneity and Goodness of Fit were low. This community represents a diverse set of occurrences with seasonal and aspect dominance that differs among sites. They are tied together by their landscape setting and presence of freshwater to oligohaline species not necessarily by dominance patterns. Based on dominance patterns alone, each plot might represent a different type. For classification purposes, more weight was given to perennial species with greater biomass, such as Schoenoplectus pungens and Typha domingensis even though their cover was low in some plots. Future sampling might best be conducted by repeatedly sampling sites across seasons and years.
Synonomy:

Related Type Name:

Short Citation:
  • Judd and Lonard 2009
  • Southeastern Ecology Working Group n.d.
States/Provinces:TX
Nations:US
Range:This vegetation occurs in interdunal swales and other marshy areas on barrier islands along the south Texas coast.
US Forest Service Ecoregions
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name:Prairie Parkland (Subtropical) Province
Province Code:255   Occurrence Status:Confident or certain
Section Name:Central Gulf Prairies and Marshes Section
Section Code:255D     Occurrence Status:Confident or certain
No Data Available
These wetlands are characterized (and may be dominated) by Schoenoplectus pungens, Typha domingensis, Flaveria brownii, Bacopa monnieri, Centella erecta, Phyla nodiflora, and/or Sesbania herbacea. Associated species may include Conoclinium betonicifolium, Setaria parviflora, Andropogon glomeratus, Pluchea odorata var. odorata, and Iva texensis. This provisional community is described from very limited plot data from Padre Island National Seashore, Texas. Some plots attributed to this type were dominated by annuals such as Flaveria brownii and Sesbania herbacea. Classification of these ephemeral ponds and depressions is difficult because of seasonal and weather-related shifts in species composition and dominance. The annual forb Flaveria brownii can tend to dominate ponds during a drought that might be dominated by different species (e.g., Schoenoplectus pungens or Typha domingensis) during wetter periods.
This vegetation occurs in interdunal swales and other marshy areas on barrier islands along the south Texas coast.
Low - Poorly Documented
No Data Available
34:C, 34i:C
Authors:
J. Teague      Version Date: 07Oct2014


References:
  • Judd, F. W., and R. I. Lonard. 2009. Vegetation of South Padre Island, Texas: Freshwater and brackish wetlands. Texas Journal of Science 61(2):83-96.
  • Southeastern Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Durham, NC.


USNVC Credits: Detailed Description of the National Vegetation Classification Types

Date Accessed:

To cite a description:
Author(s). publicationYear. Description Title [last revised revisionDate]. United States National Vegetation Classification. Federal Geographic Data Committee, Washington, D.C.

About spatial standards:
The United States Federal Geographic Data Committee (hereafter called the FGDC) is tasked to develop geospatial data standards that will enable sharing of spatial data among producers and users and support the growing National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), acting under the Office of Management Budget (OMB) Circular A-16 (OMB 1990, 2000) and Executive Order #12906 (Clinton 1994) as amended by Executive Order #13286 (Bush 2003). FGDC subcommittees and working groups, in consultation and cooperation with state, local, tribal, private, academic, and international communities, develop standards for the content, quality, and transferability of geospatial data. FGDC standards are developed through a structured process, integrated with one another to the extent possible, supportable by the current vendor community (but are independent of specific technologies), and publicly available.

About this document
This document contains type descriptions at the Association level of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. These descriptions were primarily written by NatureServe ecologists in collaboration with Federal Geographic Data Committee Vegetation Subcommittee and a wide variety of state, federal and private partners as a part of the implementation of the National Vegetation Classification. Formation descriptions were written by the Hierarchy Revisions Working Group. The descriptions are based on consultation with natural resource professionals, published literature, and other vegetation classification systems. The Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification is responsible for managing the review and formal adoption of these types into the National Vegetation Classification. Partners involved in the implementation of the USNVC include:

U.S. Government
  • Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Department of Commerce (DOC)
  • Department of Defense (DOD)
  • Department of the Interior (USDI)
  • Forest Service (FS) - Chair
  • National Agriculture Statistical Service (NASS)
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
  • National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
  • U.S. Navy (NAVY)
  • Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
  • Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)
  • National Park Service (NPS)
  • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Non U.S. Government
  • NatureServe (NS)
  • Ecological Society of America (ESA)

Disclaimer:
Given the dynamic nature of the standard, it is possible a type description is incomplete or in revision at the time of download; therefore, users of the data should track the date of access and read the revisions section of the USNVC.org website to understand the current status of the classification. While USNVC data have undergone substantial review prior to posting, it is possible that some errors or inaccuracies have remained undetected.

For information on the process used to develop these descriptions see:

Faber-Langendoen, D., T. Keeler-Wolf, D. Meidinger, D. Tart, B. Hoagland, C. Josse, G. Navarro, S. Ponomarenko, J.-P. Saucier, A. Weakley, P. Comer. 2014. EcoVeg: A new approach to vegetation description and classification. Ecological Monographs 84:533-561 (erratum 85:473).

Franklin, S., D. Faber-Langendoen, M. Jennings, T. Keeler-Wolf, O. Loucks, A. McKerrow, R.K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2012. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification. Annali di Botanica 2: 1-9.

Jennings, M. D., D. Faber-Langendoen, O. L. Louckes, R. K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2009. Standards for associations and alliances of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. Ecological Monographs 79(2):173-199.

FGDC [Federal Geographic Data Committee]. 2008. Vegetation Classification Standard, FGDC-STD-005, Version 2. Washington, DC., USA. [http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/vegetation/NVCS_V2_FINAL_2008-02.pdf]

For additional information contact:

  • Implementation of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification Standard - Alexa McKerrow (amckerrow@usgs.gov)
  • NatureServe's Development of NVC Type Descriptions - Don Faber-Langendoen (don_faber- langendoen@natureserve.org)
  • Ecological Society of America's Review of the Type Descriptions Scott.Franklin@unco.edu
  • Federal Geographic Data Committee - Vegetation Subcommittee's Activities - Marianne Burke (mburke@fs.fed.us)