Invalid Unit Specified
A3841 Vachellia farnesiana - Celtis ehrenbergiana Riparian Scrub Alliance

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence: This alliance occupies resaca bottoms and other intermittently or temporarily flooded areas in the South Texas Plains and the Coastal Prairie of Texas and Mexico and is dominated or codominated by Vachellia farnesiana.
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Sweet Acacia - Spiny Hackberry Riparian Scrub Alliance
Colloquial Name: Sweet Acacia Riparian Scrub
Hierarchy Level: Alliance
Type Concept: This alliance occupies resaca bottoms and other intermittently or temporarily flooded areas in the South Texas Plains and the Coastal Prairie of Texas and Mexico. It is dominated or codominated by Vachellia farnesiana. Other canopy species may include Celtis ehrenbergiana, Prosopis glandulosa, Parkinsonia aculeata, Mimosa pellita, and Sesbania drummondii. Canopy height and closure are variable. Other species in this alliance include Wissadula periplocifolia, Sidastrum paniculatum, Spartina spartinae, and Eleocharis montevidensis. It is a considered a natural disturbance type of river floodplains and depressions that may succeed to Celtis laevigata-dominated forest, especially on floodplains of major streams. It is similar in composition and habitat to occurrences of widespread ruderal vegetation. In wet areas, Vachellia farnesiana often forms nearly pure stands or occurs as scattered individuals within a matrix of weedy grasses during the course of secondary succession.
Diagnostic Characteristics: This alliance occupies resaca bottoms and other intermittently or temporarily flooded areas and is dominated or codominated by Vachellia farnesiana.
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: This alliance is centered on the Rio Grande delta with some associations extending into adjacent regions. It is a mixture of subtropical and temperate species. Data gaps could represent undescribed associations. Its concept and group placement need a broader review in the context of other temperate and subtropical vegetation that could have similar composition, especially in Mexico. No character species have been identified, and while there could be some differential species, they are not the dominants. It is similar in composition and habitat to occurrences of widespread ruderal vegetation. Additional data and information may differentiate natural and semi-natural associations. Kartesz (1999) uses Acacia farnesiana for Acacia smallii (which is accepted by Isely) and which is now treated as Vachellia farnesiana (USDA Plants 2017).
Similar NVC Types:
Physiognomy and Structure: Canopy height and closure vary from small trees to tall shrubs and woodland to forest. In wet areas, Acacia farnesiana often forms nearly pure stands or occurs as scattered individuals within a matrix of weedy grasses during the course of secondary succession.
Floristics: This alliance is dominated or codominated by Vachellia farnesiana (= Acacia minuta ssp. minuta). Other canopy species may include Celtis ehrenbergiana (= Celtis pallida), Prosopis glandulosa, Parkinsonia aculeata, Mimosa pellita (= Mimosa pigra), and Sesbania drummondii. Other species in this alliance include Wissadula periplocifolia, Sidastrum paniculatum, Spartina spartinae, and Eleocharis montevidensis. It is a considered a natural disturbance type of river floodplains and depressions that may succeed to Celtis laevigata-dominated forest, especially on floodplains of major streams. It is similar in composition and habitat to occurrences of widespread ruderal vegetation. In wet areas, Vachellia farnesiana often forms nearly pure stands or occurs as scattered individuals within a matrix of weedy grasses during the course of secondary succession. This woodland may grade into Acacia rigidula or Acacia berlandieri shrublands in southern Texas and Schizachyrium scoparium grasslands in the Coastal Prairie.
Dynamics: The natural disturbance of flooding helps to maintain this alliance.
Environmental Description: This woodland occurs over moderately to poorly drained soils of river floodplains and depressions, primarily in the South Texas Plains and the Coastal Prairie.
Geographic Range: This alliance occurs primarily in the South Texas Plains and the Coastal Prairie of Texas and Mexico.
Nations: MX, US
States/Provinces: MXTM, TX
US Forest Service Ecoregions (1994/1995)
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Confidence Level: Low
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: GNR
Greasons:
Name:Database Code:Classification Code:
Class 1 Forest & Woodland C01 1
Subclass 1.B Temperate & Boreal Forest & Woodland S15 1.B
Formation 1.B.3 Temperate Flooded & Swamp Forest F026 1.B.3
Division 1.B.3.Nd Western North American Interior Flooded Forest D013 1.B.3.Nd
Macrogroup M036 Interior Warm & Cool Desert Riparian Forest M036 1.B.3.Nd.2
Group G549 Tamaulipan Riparian Scrub Forest G549 1.B.3.Nd.2.a
Alliance A3841 Sweet Acacia Riparian Scrub A3841
Association CEGL002131 CEGL002131
Association CEGL007755 Huisache - Retama Riparian Forest CEGL007755
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Acacia farnesiana - Celtis pallida Riparian Scrub Alliance
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy: ? Huizachal (Rzedowski 1981)
Concept Author(s): J. Teague, in Faber-Langendoen et al. (2013)
Author of Description: J. Teague
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 18Dec2014
References:
  • Diamond, D. D. 1993. Classification of the plant communities of Texas (series level). Unpublished document. Texas Natural Heritage Program, Austin. 25 pp.
  • Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Drake, M. Hall, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, M. Russo, K. Schulz, L. Sneddon, K. Snow, and J. Teague. 2013-2019b. Screening alliances for induction into the U.S. National Vegetation Classification: Part 1 - Alliance concept review. NatureServe, Arlington, VA.
  • Kartesz, J. T. 1999. A synonymized checklist and atlas with biological attributes for the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. First edition. In: J. T. Kartesz and C. A. Meacham. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill, NC.
  • Rzedowski, J. 1981. Vegetaciòn de México. Editorial Limusa, Mexico City, Mexico. 432 pp.