Invalid Unit Specified
G654 Quercus lyrata - Quercus stellata - Nyssa sylvatica Flatwoods & Pond Forest Group

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence: These are primarily Quercus-dominated nonriverine wetland forests found in ponds, depressions, and flats along small streams, from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma.
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Overcup Oak - Post Oak - Blackgum Flatwoods & Pond Forest Group
Colloquial Name: South-Central Flatwoods & Pond Forest
Hierarchy Level: Group
Type Concept: These primarily Quercus-dominated nonriverine wetland forests are found in ponds, wet depressions, flats along small streams, and other related environments from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma. They encompass a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) areas dominated by Quercus lyrata and Quercus phellos, to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments dominated by Quercus alba, Nyssa sylvatica, and/or Quercus stellata. Other trees that may be present include Betula nigra, Carya carolinae-septentrionalis, Fraxinus americana, Liquidambar styraciflua, Nyssa biflora, Quercus michauxii, Quercus oglethorpensis, Quercus shumardii, and Quercus similis. Shrubs may include Cephalanthus occidentalis and Lyonia lucida. Herbs may include Carex albolutescens, Carex intumescens, Carex joorii, Chasmanthium laxum, Cinna arundinacea, Croton willdenowii, Danthonia spicata, Pleopeltis polypodioides ssp. michauxiana, Zephyranthes atamasca, and the moss Climacium americanum. The component associations are primarily from the Interior Low Plateau, southern Piedmont, Ridge and Valley/Cumberlands, and Ozarks, with some more peripheral occurrences in the northern Piedmont, mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, and Ouachitas.
Diagnostic Characteristics: These nonriverine wetland forests occur in ponds, wet depressions, flats along small streams, and other related environments from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma. They are primarily Quercus-dominated, with the dominant species varying by hydroperiod. Wetter (longer hydroperiod) areas are typically dominated by Quercus lyrata and Quercus phellos, with shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments being dominated by species such as Quercus alba, Quercus stellata, and/or Nyssa sylvatica.
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features: Quercus lyrata, Quercus stellata, and Nyssa sylvatica collectively span the range of hydrologic conditions represented by this vegetation group, and generally represent its range, with Nyssa sylvatica being more wide-ranging to the north, and Quercus lyrata more constrained to the south.
Classification Comments: No Data Available
Similar NVC Types:
Physiognomy and Structure: These are nonriverine wetland forests dominated by moderately tall trees. They have moderately closed canopies, and their shrub and herb layers vary in density and diversity depending on hydroperiod, which can vary from longer (wetter) to shorter (less wet). Longer hydroperiod areas tend to be more open and less diverse.
Floristics: This vegetation encompasses a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) areas dominated by Quercus lyrata and Quercus phellos, to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments dominated by Quercus alba, Nyssa sylvatica, and/or Quercus stellata. Other trees that may be present include Betula nigra, Carya carolinae-septentrionalis, Fraxinus americana, Liquidambar styraciflua, Nyssa biflora, Quercus michauxii, Quercus oglethorpensis, Quercus shumardii, and Quercus similis. Shrubs may include Cephalanthus occidentalis and Lyonia lucida. Herbs may include Carex albolutescens, Carex intumescens, Carex joorii, Chasmanthium laxum, Cinna arundinacea, Croton willdenowii, Danthonia spicata, Pleopeltis polypodioides ssp. michauxiana, Zephyranthes atamasca, and the moss Climacium americanum.
Dynamics: These primarily Quercus-dominated nonriverine wetland forests encompass a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) areas to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments. The hydrology is driven by rainwater and groundwater, but not riverine flooding.
Environmental Description: These primarily nonriverine wetland forests are found in ponds, wet depressions, flats along small streams, and other related environments. They encompass a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments.
Geographic Range: This vegetation ranges from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma, primarily in the Interior Low Plateau, southern Piedmont, Ridge and Valley/Cumberlands, and Ozarks, with some more peripheral occurrences in the northern Piedmont, mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, and Ouachitas.
Nations: US
States/Provinces: AL, AR, GA, KY, MD, MO, NC, OK?, SC, TN, VA
US Forest Service Ecoregions (2007)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Ozark Broadleaf Forest - Meadow Province
Province Code: M223    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Southern Atlantic Coastal Plains and Flatwoods Section
Section Code: 232J     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Plot Analysis Summary:
Confidence Level: Moderate
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: GNR
Greasons:
Concept Lineage: G169 and G170 first merged into a single flatwoods and pond unit, but then split into G597 (Central Flatwoods & Pond, ~glaciated) and G654 (east-central flatwoods, ~unglaciated).
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy:
Concept Author(s): D. Faber-Langendoen, in Faber-Langendoen et al. (2012)
Author of Description: M. Pyne
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 19May2015
References:
  • Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Drake, S. Gawler, M. Hall, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, L. Sneddon, K. Schulz, J. Teague, M. Russo, K. Snow, and P. Comer, editors. 2010-2017a. Divisions, Macrogroups and Groups for the Revised U.S. National Vegetation Classification. NatureServe, Arlington, VA. plus appendices. [in preparation]