Invalid Unit Specified
Group Detail Report: G654
Quercus lyrata - Quercus stellata - Nyssa sylvatica Flatwoods & Pond Forest Group

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
These are primarily Quercus-dominated nonriverine wetland forests found in ponds, depressions, and flats along small streams, from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma.
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Translated Name:Overcup Oak - Post Oak - Blackgum Flatwoods & Pond Forest Group
Colloquial Name:South-Central Flatwoods & Pond Forest
These primarily Quercus-dominated nonriverine wetland forests are found in ponds, wet depressions, flats along small streams, and other related environments from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma. They encompass a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) areas dominated by Quercus lyrata and Quercus phellos, to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments dominated by Quercus alba, Nyssa sylvatica, and/or Quercus stellata. Other trees that may be present include Betula nigra, Carya carolinae-septentrionalis, Fraxinus americana, Liquidambar styraciflua, Nyssa biflora, Quercus michauxii, Quercus oglethorpensis, Quercus shumardii, and Quercus similis. Shrubs may include Cephalanthus occidentalis and Lyonia lucida. Herbs may include Carex albolutescens, Carex intumescens, Carex joorii, Chasmanthium laxum, Cinna arundinacea, Croton willdenowii, Danthonia spicata, Pleopeltis polypodioides ssp. michauxiana, Zephyranthes atamasca, and the moss Climacium americanum. The component associations are primarily from the Interior Low Plateau, southern Piedmont, Ridge and Valley/Cumberlands, and Ozarks, with some more peripheral occurrences in the northern Piedmont, mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, and Ouachitas.
These nonriverine wetland forests occur in ponds, wet depressions, flats along small streams, and other related environments from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma. They are primarily Quercus-dominated, with the dominant species varying by hydroperiod. Wetter (longer hydroperiod) areas are typically dominated by Quercus lyrata and Quercus phellos, with shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments being dominated by species such as Quercus alba, Quercus stellata, and/or Nyssa sylvatica.
Quercus lyrata, Quercus stellata, and Nyssa sylvatica collectively span the range of hydrologic conditions represented by this vegetation group, and generally represent its range, with Nyssa sylvatica being more wide-ranging to the north, and Quercus lyrata more constrained to the south.
No Data Available
Synonomy:

Related Type Name:

Short Citation:
  • Faber-Langendoen et al. 2017a
States/Provinces:AL, AR, GA, KY, MD, MO, NC, OK?, SC, TN, VA
Nations:US
Range:This vegetation ranges from Maryland south to Alabama and Georgia, and north and west to Kentucky, Missouri and possibly Oklahoma, primarily in the Interior Low Plateau, southern Piedmont, Ridge and Valley/Cumberlands, and Ozarks, with some more peripheral occurrences in the northern Piedmont, mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, and Ouachitas.
US Forest Service Ecoregions
Domain Name:
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These are nonriverine wetland forests dominated by moderately tall trees. They have moderately closed canopies, and their shrub and herb layers vary in density and diversity depending on hydroperiod, which can vary from longer (wetter) to shorter (less wet). Longer hydroperiod areas tend to be more open and less diverse.
This vegetation encompasses a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) areas dominated by Quercus lyrata and Quercus phellos, to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments dominated by Quercus alba, Nyssa sylvatica, and/or Quercus stellata. Other trees that may be present include Betula nigra, Carya carolinae-septentrionalis, Fraxinus americana, Liquidambar styraciflua, Nyssa biflora, Quercus michauxii, Quercus oglethorpensis, Quercus shumardii, and Quercus similis. Shrubs may include Cephalanthus occidentalis and Lyonia lucida. Herbs may include Carex albolutescens, Carex intumescens, Carex joorii, Chasmanthium laxum, Cinna arundinacea, Croton willdenowii, Danthonia spicata, Pleopeltis polypodioides ssp. michauxiana, Zephyranthes atamasca, and the moss Climacium americanum.
These primarily nonriverine wetland forests are found in ponds, wet depressions, flats along small streams, and other related environments. They encompass a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments.
Moderate
These primarily Quercus-dominated nonriverine wetland forests encompass a variety of hydroperiods from longer (wetter) areas to shorter mesic or seasonally wet environments. The hydrology is driven by rainwater and groundwater, but not riverine flooding.
Authors:
M. Pyne      Version Date: 19May2015


References:
  • Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Drake, S. Gawler, M. Hall, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, L. Sneddon, K. Schulz, J. Teague, M. Russo, K. Snow, and P. Comer, editors. 2010-2017a. Divisions, Macrogroups and Groups for the Revised U.S. National Vegetation Classification. NatureServe, Arlington, VA. plus appendices. [in preparation]


USNVC Credits: Detailed Description of the National Vegetation Classification Types

Date Accessed:

To cite a description:
Author(s). publicationYear. Description Title [last revised revisionDate]. United States National Vegetation Classification. Federal Geographic Data Committee, Washington, D.C.

About spatial standards:
The United States Federal Geographic Data Committee (hereafter called the FGDC) is tasked to develop geospatial data standards that will enable sharing of spatial data among producers and users and support the growing National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), acting under the Office of Management Budget (OMB) Circular A-16 (OMB 1990, 2000) and Executive Order #12906 (Clinton 1994) as amended by Executive Order #13286 (Bush 2003). FGDC subcommittees and working groups, in consultation and cooperation with state, local, tribal, private, academic, and international communities, develop standards for the content, quality, and transferability of geospatial data. FGDC standards are developed through a structured process, integrated with one another to the extent possible, supportable by the current vendor community (but are independent of specific technologies), and publicly available.

About this document
This document contains type descriptions at the Group level of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. These descriptions were primarily written by NatureServe ecologists in collaboration with Federal Geographic Data Committee Vegetation Subcommittee and a wide variety of state, federal and private partners as a part of the implementation of the National Vegetation Classification. Formation descriptions were written by the Hierarchy Revisions Working Group. The descriptions are based on consultation with natural resource professionals, published literature, and other vegetation classification systems. The Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification is responsible for managing the review and formal adoption of these types into the National Vegetation Classification. Partners involved in the implementation of the USNVC include:

U.S. Government
  • Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Department of Commerce (DOC)
  • Department of Defense (DOD)
  • Department of the Interior (USDI)
  • Forest Service (FS) - Chair
  • National Agriculture Statistical Service (NASS)
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
  • National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
  • U.S. Navy (NAVY)
  • Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
  • Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)
  • National Park Service (NPS)
  • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Non U.S. Government
  • NatureServe (NS)
  • Ecological Society of America (ESA)

Disclaimer:
Given the dynamic nature of the standard, it is possible a type description is incomplete or in revision at the time of download; therefore, users of the data should track the date of access and read the revisions section of the USNVC.org website to understand the current status of the classification. While USNVC data have undergone substantial review prior to posting, it is possible that some errors or inaccuracies have remained undetected.

For information on the process used to develop these descriptions see:

Faber-Langendoen, D., T. Keeler-Wolf, D. Meidinger, D. Tart, B. Hoagland, C. Josse, G. Navarro, S. Ponomarenko, J.-P. Saucier, A. Weakley, P. Comer. 2014. EcoVeg: A new approach to vegetation description and classification. Ecological Monographs 84:533-561 (erratum 85:473).

Franklin, S., D. Faber-Langendoen, M. Jennings, T. Keeler-Wolf, O. Loucks, A. McKerrow, R.K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2012. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification. Annali di Botanica 2: 1-9.

Jennings, M. D., D. Faber-Langendoen, O. L. Louckes, R. K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2009. Standards for associations and alliances of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. Ecological Monographs 79(2):173-199.

FGDC [Federal Geographic Data Committee]. 2008. Vegetation Classification Standard, FGDC-STD-005, Version 2. Washington, DC., USA. [http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/vegetation/NVCS_V2_FINAL_2008-02.pdf]

For additional information contact:

  • Implementation of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification Standard - Alexa McKerrow (amckerrow@usgs.gov)
  • NatureServe's Development of NVC Type Descriptions - Don Faber-Langendoen (don_faber- langendoen@natureserve.org)
  • Ecological Society of America's Review of the Type Descriptions Scott.Franklin@unco.edu
  • Federal Geographic Data Committee - Vegetation Subcommittee's Activities - Marianne Burke (mburke@fs.fed.us)