Invalid Unit Specified
M106 Temperate Pacific Seaweed Intertidal Vegetation Macrogroup

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence: This macrogroup is of marine algae living on tidal flats and rocky areas in the near-shore intertidal zone of the temperate North America Pacific coast. Some dominant species include Enteromorpha spp., Fucus distichus, Postelsia palmiformis, and Vaucheria longicaulis.
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Temperate Pacific Seaweed Intertidal Vegetation Macrogroup
Colloquial Name: Temperate Pacific Seaweed Intertidal Vegetation
Hierarchy Level: Macrogroup
Type Concept: This macrogroup consists of algal communities on coastal flats and intertidal rocky zones found along the north Pacific coast from Kodiak Island and Cook Inlet, Alaska, south to central California. Algae are the dominant vegetation on mud or gravel flats where little vascular vegetation is present due to the daily (in some cases twice daily) tidal flooding of salt or brackish water. Dominant species include Enteromorpha spp., Fucus distichus, Postelsia palmiformis, and Vaucheria longicaulis. Habitats are tidal flats of mud or gravel, rocky intertidal pools and reefs. These habitats are exposed and inundated daily and sometimes twice daily.
Diagnostic Characteristics: Tidal surfaces with algal communities exposed daily at low tide.
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: No Data Available
Similar NVC Types:
M184 Temperate Pacific Seagrass Intertidal Vegetation, note:
Physiognomy and Structure: Low-statured (<0.5 m) herbaceous submerged and exposed saltwater algae-dominated areas within the intertidal zone.
Floristics: Characteristic species include Enteromorpha spp., Fucus distichus, Postelsia palmiformis, and Vaucheria longicaulis. Floristic information compiled in part from Viereck et al. (1992), Holland and Keil (1995), and Boggs (2002).
Dynamics: The near-shore intertidal zone is exposed daily (and sometimes twice daily) at low tide. Depth and extent of inundation may change due to tectonic uplift or subsidence, or by significant sedimentation.
Environmental Description: Soil/substrate/hydrology: Tidal flats of mud and gravel or rocky substrates. Tidal flats form a narrow band along oceanic inlets and are more extensive at the mouths of larger rivers. Tidal inundation of salt or brackish water and exposure occurs daily (in some cases twice daily). Environmental information compiled in part from Viereck et al. (1992), Holland and Keil (1995), and Boggs (2002).
Geographic Range: This macrogroup is found along the north Pacific Coast from Kodiak Island and Cook Inlet, Alaska, south to central California.
Nations: CA, US
States/Provinces: AK, BC, CA, OR, WA
US Forest Service Ecoregions (2007)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Pacific Lowland Mixed Forest Province
Province Code: 242    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Southern California Coast Section
Section Code: 261B     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Plot Analysis Summary:
Confidence Level: Moderate
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: GNR
Greasons:
Name:Database Code:Classification Code:
Class 5 Aquatic Vegetation C05 5
Subclass 5.A Saltwater Aquatic Vegetation S09 5.A
Formation 5.A.2 Benthic Macroalgae Saltwater Vegetation F053 5.A.2
Division 5.A.2.Wb Temperate Intertidal Shore D047 5.A.2.Wb
Macrogroup M106 Temperate Pacific Seaweed Intertidal Vegetation M106 5.A.2.Wb.2
Group G385 North American Pacific Intertidal Algal Flat G385 5.A.2.Wb.2.a
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy: >< III.B.3.d - Halophytic herb wet meadow (Viereck et al. 1992)
>< III.D.2.a - Four-leaf marestail (Viereck et al. 1992)
Concept Author(s): Faber-Langendoen et al. (2014)
Author of Description: K. Boggs, G. Kittel, M.S. Reid
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 29Mar2017
References:
  • Boggs, K. 2002. Terrestrial ecological systems for the Cook Inlet, Bristol Bay, and Alaska Peninsula ecoregions. The Nature Conservancy, Anchorage, AK.
  • Comer, P., D. Faber-Langendoen, R. Evans, S. Gawler, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, M. Russo, K. Schulz, K. Snow, J. Teague, and R. White. 2003-present. Ecological systems of the United States: A working classification of U.S. terrestrial systems. NatureServe, Arlington, VA.
  • Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Drake, S. Gawler, M. Hall, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, L. Sneddon, K. Schulz, J. Teague, M. Russo, K. Snow, and P. Comer, editors. 2010-2019a. Divisions, Macrogroups and Groups for the Revised U.S. National Vegetation Classification. NatureServe, Arlington, VA. plus appendices. [in preparation]
  • Holland, V. L., and D. J. Keil. 1995. California vegetation. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, IA. 516 pp.
  • Viereck, L. A., C. T. Dyrness, A. R. Batten, and K. J. Wenzlick. 1992. The Alaska vegetation classification. General Technical Report PNW-GTR286. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR. 278 pp.