Invalid Unit Specified
D032 Prosopis glandulosa / Typha domingensis - Schoenoplectus pungens Southwestern North American Warm Desert Freshwater Marsh & Bosque Division

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence: Herbaceous marshes and riparian shrublands found throughout canyons and desert valleys of the warm desert regions of the southwestern U.S. and adjacent Mexico.
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Honey Mesquite / Southern Cattail - Common Threesquare Southwestern North American Warm Desert Freshwater Marsh & Bosque Division
Colloquial Name: Southwestern North American Warm Desert Freshwater Marsh & Bosque
Hierarchy Level: Division
Type Concept: This division covers herbaceous marshes and riparian shrublands widely distributed throughout canyons and desert valleys of the warm desert regions of the southwestern U.S. and adjacent Mexico. Riparian shrublands are found in riparian corridors of small, medium and large perennial and intermittent streams and rivers at low elevations (<1100 m). The vegetation is low scrub or shrub, not tall trees. Dominant scrub species are Prosopis glandulosa and Prosopis velutina, and dominant shrubs include Baccharis salicifolia, Pluchea sericea, Salix geyeriana, Shepherdia argentea, and Salix exigua. Woody vegetation is relatively dense, especially when compared to drier washes. Marsh vegetation is characterized by a lush, dense herbaceous layer with low diversity occurring sometimes as a monoculture. Dominant species include Carex pellita (= Carex lanuginosa), Carex praegracilis, Cyperus spp., Distichlis spicata, Eleocharis palustris, Flaveria chlorifolia, Helianthus paradoxus, Juncus balticus, Paspalum distichum, Ranunculus aquatilis, Schoenoplectus americanus, Schoenoplectus pungens, and Typha domingensis. Marsh vegetation occurs in bottomlands along drainages, in river floodplain depressions, cienegas, oxbow lakes, below seeps, on frequently flooded gravel bars, low-lying sidebars, infilled side channels, small ponds, stockponds, ditches and slow-moving streams, and perennial streams in valleys and mountain foothills, from 890 to 1560 m (2930-5120 feet) in elevation. Marsh substrates are variable but are generally fine-textured and often alkaline. Hydrologic regimes vary from seasonal inundation followed by complete soil desiccation to year-round standing water.
Diagnostic Characteristics: Desert climes of the southwestern U.S., seasonal inundation or at least near-surface or sub-surface water table saturation, characterized by emergent herbaceous vegetation, or intermittent and perennial streambanks and floodplains with native woody shrub species. Dominant scrub species are Prosopis glandulosa and Prosopis velutina, and dominant shrubs include Baccharis salicifolia, Pluchea sericea, Salix exigua, Salix geyeriana, and Shepherdia argentea. Dominant marsh species include Carex pellita, Carex praegracilis, Cyperus spp., Distichlis spicata, Eleocharis palustris, Flaveria chlorifolia, Helianthus paradoxus, Juncus balticus, Paspalum distichum, Ranunculus aquatilis, Schoenoplectus americanus, Schoenoplectus pungens, and Typha domingensis.
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: Vegetation is dependent upon annual rise in the water table or annual/periodic flooding/saturation.
Similar NVC Types:
D031 Western North American Temperate & Boreal Freshwater Marsh, Wet Meadow & Shrubland, note: includes marshes and shrubby riparian areas that occur in temperate and boreal climates further north.
D323 Eastern North American Temperate & Boreal Freshwater Marsh, Wet Meadow & Shrubland, note:
Physiognomy and Structure: The riparian shrublands are dominated by low scrub trees or shrubs, not tall trees. Woody vegetation is relatively dense, especially when compared to drier washes. The marsh vegetation is characterized by a lush, dense herbaceous layer with low diversity, occurring sometimes as a monoculture.
Floristics: Dominant scrub species are Prosopis glandulosa and Prosopis velutina, and dominant shrubs include Baccharis salicifolia, Pluchea sericea, Salix exigua, Salix geyeriana, and Shepherdia argentea. Dominant marsh species include Carex pellita (= Carex lanuginosa), Carex praegracilis, Cyperus spp., Distichlis spicata, Eleocharis palustris, Flaveria chlorifolia, Helianthus paradoxus, Juncus balticus, Paspalum distichum, Ranunculus aquatilis, Schoenoplectus americanus, Schoenoplectus pungens, and Typha domingensis.
Dynamics: No Data Available
Environmental Description: Soils/substrate: Riparian shrublands are found in riparian corridors of small, medium and large perennial and intermittent streams and rivers at low elevations (<1100 m). Marsh vegetation occurs in bottomlands along drainages, in river floodplain depressions, cienegas, oxbow lakes, below seeps, on frequently flooded gravel bars, low-lying sidebars, infilled side channels, small ponds, stockponds, ditches and slow-moving streams, and perennial streams in valleys and mountain foothills, from 890 to 1560 m (2930-5120 feet) in elevation. Marsh substrates are variable but are generally fine-textured and often alkaline. Hydrologic regimes vary from seasonal inundation followed by complete soil desiccation to year-round standing water.
Geographic Range: This division is found in desert climes of the southwestern U.S., including Trans-Pecos Texas, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico, and adjacent Mexico.
Nations: MX, US
States/Provinces: AZ, CA, CO, MXBC, MXCH, MXSO, NM, NV, TX
US Forest Service Ecoregions (2007)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Southwest Plateau and Plains Dry Steppe and Shrub Province
Province Code: 315    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name:
Section Code:     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Plot Analysis Summary:
Confidence Level: Moderate
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: GNR
Greasons:
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy:
Concept Author(s): W.J. Mitsch and J.G. Gosselink (2000)
Author of Description: G. Kittel and D. Faber-Langendoen
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 06Jan2016
References:
  • Barbour, M. G., and W. D. Billings, editors. 2000. North American terrestrial vegetation. Second edition. Cambridge University Press, New York. 434 pp.
  • Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Drake, S. Gawler, M. Hall, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, L. Sneddon, K. Schulz, J. Teague, M. Russo, K. Snow, and P. Comer, editors. 2010-2017a. Divisions, Macrogroups and Groups for the Revised U.S. National Vegetation Classification. NatureServe, Arlington, VA. plus appendices. [in preparation]
  • Mitsch, W. J., and J. G. Gosselink. 2000. Wetlands. Third edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York. 920 pp.