Invalid Unit Specified
Division Detail Report: D032
Prosopis glandulosa / Typha domingensis - Schoenoplectus pungens Southwestern North American Warm Desert Freshwater Marsh & Bosque Division

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Herbaceous marshes and riparian shrublands found throughout canyons and desert valleys of the warm desert regions of the southwestern U.S. and adjacent Mexico.
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Translated Name:Honey Mesquite / Southern Cattail - Common Threesquare Southwestern North American Warm Desert Freshwater Marsh & Bosque Division
Colloquial Name:Southwestern North American Warm Desert Freshwater Marsh & Bosque
This division covers herbaceous marshes and riparian shrublands widely distributed throughout canyons and desert valleys of the warm desert regions of the southwestern U.S. and adjacent Mexico. Riparian shrublands are found in riparian corridors of small, medium and large perennial and intermittent streams and rivers at low elevations (<1100 m). The vegetation is low scrub or shrub, not tall trees. Dominant scrub species are Prosopis glandulosa and Prosopis velutina, and dominant shrubs include Baccharis salicifolia, Pluchea sericea, Salix geyeriana, Shepherdia argentea, and Salix exigua. Woody vegetation is relatively dense, especially when compared to drier washes. Marsh vegetation is characterized by a lush, dense herbaceous layer with low diversity occurring sometimes as a monoculture. Dominant species include Carex pellita (= Carex lanuginosa), Carex praegracilis, Cyperus spp., Distichlis spicata, Eleocharis palustris, Flaveria chlorifolia, Helianthus paradoxus, Juncus balticus, Paspalum distichum, Ranunculus aquatilis, Schoenoplectus americanus, Schoenoplectus pungens, and Typha domingensis. Marsh vegetation occurs in bottomlands along drainages, in river floodplain depressions, cienegas, oxbow lakes, below seeps, on frequently flooded gravel bars, low-lying sidebars, infilled side channels, small ponds, stockponds, ditches and slow-moving streams, and perennial streams in valleys and mountain foothills, from 890 to 1560 m (2930-5120 feet) in elevation. Marsh substrates are variable but are generally fine-textured and often alkaline. Hydrologic regimes vary from seasonal inundation followed by complete soil desiccation to year-round standing water.
Desert climes of the southwestern U.S., seasonal inundation or at least near-surface or sub-surface water table saturation, characterized by emergent herbaceous vegetation, or intermittent and perennial streambanks and floodplains with native woody shrub species. Dominant scrub species are Prosopis glandulosa and Prosopis velutina, and dominant shrubs include Baccharis salicifolia, Pluchea sericea, Salix exigua, Salix geyeriana, and Shepherdia argentea. Dominant marsh species include Carex pellita, Carex praegracilis, Cyperus spp., Distichlis spicata, Eleocharis palustris, Flaveria chlorifolia, Helianthus paradoxus, Juncus balticus, Paspalum distichum, Ranunculus aquatilis, Schoenoplectus americanus, Schoenoplectus pungens, and Typha domingensis.
Vegetation is dependent upon annual rise in the water table or annual/periodic flooding/saturation.
Synonomy:

Related Type Name:

Short Citation:
  • Barbour and Billings 2000
  • Faber-Langendoen et al. 2017a
  • Mitsch and Gosselink 2000
States/Provinces:AZ, CA, CO, MXBC, MXCH, MXSO, NM, NV, TX
Nations:MX, US
Range:This division is found in desert climes of the southwestern U.S., including Trans-Pecos Texas, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico, and adjacent Mexico.
US Forest Service Ecoregions
Domain Name:
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The riparian shrublands are dominated by low scrub trees or shrubs, not tall trees. Woody vegetation is relatively dense, especially when compared to drier washes. The marsh vegetation is characterized by a lush, dense herbaceous layer with low diversity, occurring sometimes as a monoculture.
Dominant scrub species are Prosopis glandulosa and Prosopis velutina, and dominant shrubs include Baccharis salicifolia, Pluchea sericea, Salix exigua, Salix geyeriana, and Shepherdia argentea. Dominant marsh species include Carex pellita (= Carex lanuginosa), Carex praegracilis, Cyperus spp., Distichlis spicata, Eleocharis palustris, Flaveria chlorifolia, Helianthus paradoxus, Juncus balticus, Paspalum distichum, Ranunculus aquatilis, Schoenoplectus americanus, Schoenoplectus pungens, and Typha domingensis.
Soils/substrate: Riparian shrublands are found in riparian corridors of small, medium and large perennial and intermittent streams and rivers at low elevations (<1100 m). Marsh vegetation occurs in bottomlands along drainages, in river floodplain depressions, cienegas, oxbow lakes, below seeps, on frequently flooded gravel bars, low-lying sidebars, infilled side channels, small ponds, stockponds, ditches and slow-moving streams, and perennial streams in valleys and mountain foothills, from 890 to 1560 m (2930-5120 feet) in elevation. Marsh substrates are variable but are generally fine-textured and often alkaline. Hydrologic regimes vary from seasonal inundation followed by complete soil desiccation to year-round standing water.
Moderate
No Data Available
Authors:
G. Kittel and D. Faber-Langendoen      Version Date: 06Jan2016


References:
  • Barbour, M. G., and W. D. Billings, editors. 2000. North American terrestrial vegetation. Second edition. Cambridge University Press, New York. 434 pp.
  • Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Drake, S. Gawler, M. Hall, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, L. Sneddon, K. Schulz, J. Teague, M. Russo, K. Snow, and P. Comer, editors. 2010-2017a. Divisions, Macrogroups and Groups for the Revised U.S. National Vegetation Classification. NatureServe, Arlington, VA. plus appendices. [in preparation]
  • Mitsch, W. J., and J. G. Gosselink. 2000. Wetlands. Third edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York. 920 pp.


USNVC Credits: Detailed Description of the National Vegetation Classification Types

Date Accessed:

To cite a description:
Author(s). publicationYear. Description Title [last revised revisionDate]. United States National Vegetation Classification. Federal Geographic Data Committee, Washington, D.C.

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About this document
This document contains type descriptions at the Division level of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. These descriptions were primarily written by NatureServe ecologists in collaboration with Federal Geographic Data Committee Vegetation Subcommittee and a wide variety of state, federal and private partners as a part of the implementation of the National Vegetation Classification. Formation descriptions were written by the Hierarchy Revisions Working Group. The descriptions are based on consultation with natural resource professionals, published literature, and other vegetation classification systems. The Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification is responsible for managing the review and formal adoption of these types into the National Vegetation Classification. Partners involved in the implementation of the USNVC include:

U.S. Government
  • Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Department of Commerce (DOC)
  • Department of Defense (DOD)
  • Department of the Interior (USDI)
  • Forest Service (FS) - Chair
  • National Agriculture Statistical Service (NASS)
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
  • National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
  • U.S. Navy (NAVY)
  • Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
  • Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)
  • National Park Service (NPS)
  • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Non U.S. Government
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  • Ecological Society of America (ESA)

Disclaimer:
Given the dynamic nature of the standard, it is possible a type description is incomplete or in revision at the time of download; therefore, users of the data should track the date of access and read the revisions section of the USNVC.org website to understand the current status of the classification. While USNVC data have undergone substantial review prior to posting, it is possible that some errors or inaccuracies have remained undetected.

For information on the process used to develop these descriptions see:

Faber-Langendoen, D., T. Keeler-Wolf, D. Meidinger, D. Tart, B. Hoagland, C. Josse, G. Navarro, S. Ponomarenko, J.-P. Saucier, A. Weakley, P. Comer. 2014. EcoVeg: A new approach to vegetation description and classification. Ecological Monographs 84:533-561 (erratum 85:473).

Franklin, S., D. Faber-Langendoen, M. Jennings, T. Keeler-Wolf, O. Loucks, A. McKerrow, R.K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2012. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification. Annali di Botanica 2: 1-9.

Jennings, M. D., D. Faber-Langendoen, O. L. Louckes, R. K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2009. Standards for associations and alliances of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. Ecological Monographs 79(2):173-199.

FGDC [Federal Geographic Data Committee]. 2008. Vegetation Classification Standard, FGDC-STD-005, Version 2. Washington, DC., USA. [http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/vegetation/NVCS_V2_FINAL_2008-02.pdf]

For additional information contact:

  • Implementation of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification Standard - Alexa McKerrow (amckerrow@usgs.gov)
  • NatureServe's Development of NVC Type Descriptions - Don Faber-Langendoen (don_faber- langendoen@natureserve.org)
  • Ecological Society of America's Review of the Type Descriptions Scott.Franklin@unco.edu
  • Federal Geographic Data Committee - Vegetation Subcommittee's Activities - Marianne Burke (mburke@fs.fed.us)