Invalid Unit Specified
M158 Juniperus ashei - Juniperus pinchotii - Quercus mohriana Scrub & Open Vegetation Macrogroup

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence: This scrub woodland and shrubland vegetation is found in the High, Rolling, and Red Bed plains of Texas and Oklahoma ranging south into parts of the Edwards Plateau and marginally in the Chihuahuan Desert regions of Texas and possibly adjacent Mexico, as well as the Southwestern Tablelands. Occurrences on dry, rocky sites typically include evergreen junipers and oaks such as Juniperus ashei, Juniperus monosperma, Juniperus pinchotii, Quercus fusiformis, Quercus havardii, Quercus mohriana, and Quercus sinuata, as well as Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa, Buddleja racemosa, Dalea formosa, and Mimosa borealis in some examples.
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Ashe's Juniper - Pinchot's Juniper - Mohr Oak Scrub & Open Vegetation Macrogroup
Colloquial Name: Great Plains Comanchian Scrub & Open Vegetation
Hierarchy Level: Macrogroup
Type Concept: This scrub woodland vegetation is found in the High, Rolling, and Red Bed plains of Texas and Oklahoma ranging south into parts of the Edwards Plateau and Chihuahuan Desert regions of Texas, as well as the Southwestern Tablelands. Occurrences on dry, rocky sites typically include evergreen junipers and oaks such as Juniperus ashei, Juniperus monosperma, Juniperus pinchotii, Quercus fusiformis, Quercus havardii, Quercus mohriana, and Quercus sinuata, as well as Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa in some examples. Other woody species include Buddleja racemosa, Cercocarpus montanus, Dalea formosa, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Mimosa borealis, Rhus lanceolata, and Rhus trilobata. On deeper alluvial soils, Prosopis glandulosa may dominate, with species such as Mahonia trifoliolata, Sideroxylon lanuginosum, and Ziziphus obtusifolia also commonly encountered. Characteristic graminoids include Aristida purpurea, Bouteloua curtipendula, Bouteloua gracilis, Bouteloua hirsuta, Bouteloua dactyloides, Pleuraphis mutica, and Schizachyrium scoparium. Forbs, including species such as Artemisia ludoviciana, Calylophus sp., Chaetopappa ericoides, Croton monanthogynus, Indigofera miniata, Krameria lanceolata, Melampodium leucanthum, Rhynchosia senna, and Ruellia nudiflora, may also be present. The canopy is less than 6 m in height, and may be open with a grassy or rocky understory, or may form dense low patches or mottes interspersed with grasslands and rock outcrops. Bare ground is often conspicuous, and herbaceous cover, where present, is usually dominated by mid to short grasses and forbs. This vegetation occupies dry, rocky sites on mesas and escarpment breaks over a variety of geologic strata, including sandstones, shales, limestone and basalt. Alternatively, Prosopis glandulosa-dominated occurrences may occupy deeper, alluvial soils, often along drainages or topographic lows. Soils are variable in depth, and this vegetation can occur where there is little soil development.
Diagnostic Characteristics: These are Quercus and Juniperus scrub woodlands and shrublands, as well as Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa woodlands in the southwestern Great Plains and adjacent areas. This does not include vegetation characterized by Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa occurring in southern Texas.
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features: None of the proposed species occur across the range of the type. Juniperus pinchotii and Quercus mohriana have the wider ranges within this type. Prosopis glandulosa is in most examples within its range, but is absent from the northern examples. Likewise, neither Juniperus pinchotii nor Quercus mohriana even occur much in examples of this type on the central and southern Edwards Plateau. That almost argues for Juniperus ashei, Juniperus pinchotii, and Quercus mohriana (D. Diamond pers. comm.).
Classification Comments: Comanchian Oak - Juniper Scrub Group (G191) represents oak and juniper scrub woodlands and shrublands in the southwestern Great Plains and adjacent areas. It overlaps some with Madrean Pinyon - Juniper Woodland Group (G200) in Madrean Lowland Evergreen Woodland Macrogroup (M010) and Balconian Dry Forest & Woodland Group (G126) in Balconian Forest & Woodland Macrogroup (M015). These relationships should be examined. Due to the reproductive nature of some of the dominant species, it often exhibits patch dominance by a single species. Classification of this group as well as Comanchian Mesquite - Mixed Scrub Group (G192) is further complicated because they may be difficult to distinguish from compositionally and structurally similar ruderal vegetation. G192 as described does not include vegetation characterized by Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa occurring in southern Texas.
Similar NVC Types:
Physiognomy and Structure: Physiognomic expression varies from open, short, stunted woodlands, less than 6 m in height, to low dense shrublands. Many stands are dominated by evergreen oaks and junipers, but deciduous shrubs are also common. Some examples are dominated by Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa, in which the small size of the leaflets allows light to reach the ground even through more closed canopies.
Floristics: Examples are dominated by evergreen junipers and oaks such as Juniperus ashei, Juniperus monosperma, Juniperus pinchotii, Juniperus scopulorum, Quercus fusiformis, Quercus havardii, Quercus mohriana, and Quercus sinuata, as well as Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa in some examples. Other woody species include Acacia greggii, Aloysia gratissima, Buddleja racemosa, Cercocarpus montanus, Dalea formosa, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Mahonia trifoliolata, Mimosa borealis, Prosopis glandulosa, Rhus lanceolata, Rhus trilobata, Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii, and Ungnadia speciosa. In addition, Yucca glauca and Opuntia spp. may be present. On deeper alluvial soils, Prosopis glandulosa may dominate, with species such as Mahonia trifoliolata, Sideroxylon lanuginosum, and Ziziphus obtusifolia also commonly encountered. Field layer cover is variable but often sparse. Characteristic graminoids, when present, include Aristida purpurea, Bouteloua curtipendula, Bouteloua gracilis, Bouteloua hirsuta, Bouteloua dactyloides (= Buchloe dactyloides), Nassella leucotricha, Pleuraphis mutica, Schizachyrium scoparium, and Sporobolus vaginiflorus. Forbs, including species such as Artemisia ludoviciana, Calylophus sp., Chaetopappa ericoides, Croton monanthogynus, Indigofera miniata, Krameria lanceolata, Melampodium leucanthum, Mimosa spp., Rhynchosia senna, and Ruellia nudiflora, may also be present. Additional forbs characteristic of open vegetation of rock outcrops are Lesquerella gordonii, Lesquerella ovalifolia, Sedum nuttallianum, and Sedum pulchellum.
Dynamics: No Data Available
Environmental Description: Examples of ~Comanchian Oak - Juniper Scrub Group (G191)$$ occupy dry, rocky sites on mesas and escarpment breaks over a variety of geologic strata, including sandstones, shales, limestone and basalt. Soils are variable and this vegetation can occur where there is little soil development. ~Comanchian Mesquite - Mixed Scrub Group (G192)$$ occurs on a variety of soil types but is best developed on bottomland soils (L. Elliott pers. comm., D. Diamond. pers. comm.).
Geographic Range: This scrub woodland vegetation is found in the High, Rolling, and Red Bed plains of Texas and Oklahoma ranging south into parts of the Edwards Plateau and marginally in the Chihuahuan Desert regions of Texas and possibly adjacent Mexico, as well as the Southwestern Tablelands.
Nations: MX?, US
States/Provinces: MXCH?, MXCO?, NM?, OK, TX
US Forest Service Ecoregions (2007)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Southwest Plateau and Plains Dry Steppe and Shrub Province
Province Code: 315    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Texas High Plains Section
Section Code: 315B     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Plot Analysis Summary:
Confidence Level: Low
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: GNR
Greasons:
Name:Database Code:Classification Code:
Class 2 Shrub & Herb Vegetation C02 2
Subclass 2.B Temperate & Boreal Grassland & Shrubland S18 2.B
Formation 2.B.2 Temperate Grassland & Shrubland F012 2.B.2
Division 2.B.2.Nb Central North American Grassland & Shrubland D023 2.B.2.Nb
Macrogroup M158 Great Plains Comanchian Scrub & Open Vegetation M158 2.B.2.Nb.5
Group G191 Comanchian Oak - Juniper Scrub G191 2.B.2.Nb.5.b
Group G192 Comanchian Mesquite - Mixed Scrub G192 2.B.2.Nb.5.c
Group G598 Comanchian Barrens & Glade G598 2.B.2.Nb.5.a
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy: > Prosopis glandulosa Shrubland Alliance (Hoagland 2000)
>< Ashe Juniper - Redberry (Pinchot) Juniper: 66 (Eyre 1980)
>< Live Oak - Mesquite Savanna (Tharp 1939)
>< Mesquite - Grassland (Tharp 1939)
>< Mesquite Grassland (Hoagland 2008)
>< Mesquite Plains (Blair and Hubbell 1938)
>< Mohrs (Shin) Oak: 67 (Eyre 1980)
Concept Author(s): J. Teague, in Faber-Langendoen et al. (2014)
Author of Description: M. Pyne and J. Teague
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 07May2015
References:
  • Blair, W. F., and T. H. Hubbell. 1938. The biotic districts of Oklahoma. The American Midland Naturalist 20:425-454.
  • Bray, W. L. 1901. The ecological relations of the vegetation of western Texas. Botanical Gazette 32:102.
  • Diamond, David D. Personal communication. Director, Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership (MoRAP), University of Missouri, Columbia. [http://www.cerc.usgs.gov/morap/StaffMembers.aspx?StaffMemberId=474]
  • Elliott, Lee. Personal communication. The Nature Conservancy, San Antonio, TX.
  • Eyre, F. H., editor. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Society of American Foresters, Washington, DC. 148 pp.
  • Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Drake, S. Gawler, M. Hall, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, C. Nordman, M. Pyne, M. Reid, L. Sneddon, K. Schulz, J. Teague, M. Russo, K. Snow, and P. Comer, editors. 2010-2019a. Divisions, Macrogroups and Groups for the Revised U.S. National Vegetation Classification. NatureServe, Arlington, VA. plus appendices. [in preparation]
  • Hoagland, B. 2000. The vegetation of Oklahoma: A classification for landscape mapping and conservation planning. The Southwestern Naturalist 45(4):385-420.
  • Hoagland, B. W. 2008. Vegetation of Oklahoma In: K. S. Johnson and K. V. Luza, editors. Earth Sciences and Mineral Resources of Oklahoma. Oklahoma Geological Survey Educational Publication #9. Norman. [http://www.biosurvey.ou.edu/download/publications/HoaglandOGS08.pdf]
  • Tharp, B. C. 1939. The vegetation of Texas. Texas Academy of Science, Nontechnical Publication Series, Austin.
  • TNC [The Nature Conservancy]. 2004b. A biodiversity and conservation assessment of the Edwards Plateau Ecoregion. Edwards Plateau Ecoregional Planning Team, The Nature Conservancy, San Antonio, TX.