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Association Detail Report: CEGL006598
Rhododendron arborescens / Marshallia grandiflora - Triantha glutinosa - Platanthera flava var. herbiola Riverscour Wet Meadow

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
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Translated Name:Smooth Azalea / Monongahela Barbara's-buttons - Sticky Bog-asphodel - Pale-green Orchid Riverscour Wet Meadow
Colloquial Name:Barbara's-buttons Riverscour Wet Meadow
This herbaceous riverscour prairie occurs on temporarily flooded sand and cobbles in the Allegheny Mountains region of West Virginia, at elevations between 1060 and 1100 m. It is a small-patch type that occupies flat to gently sloping islands, cobble bars, and shorelines along high-gradient streams. Ice-scour and flood deposition/scour keep this community open and prevent accumulation of organic material in the substrate. Flooding can occur at any time of year. The community is characterized by a remarkable profusion of showy, flowering forbs, which share a tolerance for high-energy flooding and ice-scour. The shrub layer, kept at low stature and cover by frequent ice-scour, averages 12% cover and includes Rhododendron arborescens, Hypericum densiflorum, and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa. The herbaceous layer, averaging 60% cover, includes a large number of species with high constancy, including Marshallia grandiflora, Euthamia graminifolia var. graminifolia, Carex stricta, Eleocharis tenuis, Sanguisorba canadensis, Triantha glutinosa, Hypericum ellipticum, Solidago rugosa, Calamagrostis canadensis var. canadensis, Trautvetteria caroliniensis var. caroliniensis, Juncus dudleyi, Potentilla simplex, Houstonia serpyllifolia, Phlox maculata, Deschampsia caespitosa, Lycopus uniflorus var. uniflorus, and Platanthera flava var. herbiola. Exotic weeds washed in by the river typically include Prunella vulgaris, Anthoxanthum odoratum ssp. odoratum, and Daucus carota. Cover by nonvascular plants is insignificant. Indicator species that help to distinguish this community from others within the herbaceous physiognomy for high-elevation wetlands of the Allegheny Mountains region include Marshallia grandiflora, Juncus dudleyi, Krigia biflora var. biflora, Lysimachia quadrifolia, Phlox maculata, Platanthera flava var. herbiola, Rhododendron arborescens, Sanguisorba canadensis, Triantha glutinosa, and Trautvetteria caroliniensis var. caroliniensis. Mean species richness of vascular plants is 37 taxa per 400 square meters.
No Data Available
Four plots (1 occurrence) represent this type, which was classified as part of a 2004-2006 study of high-elevation wetlands in West Virginia's Allegheny Mountains region. (Byers et al. 2007).
Synonomy: = Rhododendron arborescens / Marshallia grandiflora - Triantha glutinosa - Platanthera flava var. herbiola Riverscour Prairie (Byers et al. 2007)

Related Type Name:

Short Citation:
  • Byers et al. 2007
  • Eastern Ecology Working Group n.d.
  • Fike 1999
  • Zimmerman 2011u
  • Zimmerman et al. 2012
States/Provinces:PA?, WV
Nations:US
Range:This community is known from the Allegheny Mountains region of West Virginia at elevations between 1060 and 1100 m. The single known occurrence is on the Upper Shavers Fork of the Cheat River. This type may possibly occur in a similar setting in the headwaters of the Gauley River.
US Forest Service Ecoregions
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name:Central Appalachian Broadleaf Forest - Coniferous Forest - Meadow Province
Province Code:M221   Occurrence Status:Confident or certain
Section Name:Allegheny Mountains Section
Section Code:M221B     Occurrence Status:Confident or certain
No Data Available
This herbaceous riverscour prairie occurs in the Allegheny Mountains region of West Virginia. The community is characterized by a remarkable profusion of showy, flowering forbs, which share a tolerance for high-energy flooding and ice-scour. The shrub layer, kept at low stature and cover by frequent ice-scour, averages 12% cover and includes Rhododendron arborescens, Hypericum densiflorum, and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa. The herbaceous layer, averaging 60% cover, includes a large number of species with high constancy, including Marshallia grandiflora, Euthamia graminifolia var. graminifolia, Carex stricta, Eleocharis tenuis, Sanguisorba canadensis, Triantha glutinosa, Hypericum ellipticum, Solidago rugosa, Calamagrostis canadensis var. canadensis, Trautvetteria caroliniensis var. caroliniensis, Juncus dudleyi, Potentilla simplex, Houstonia serpyllifolia, Phlox maculata, Deschampsia caespitosa, Lycopus uniflorus var. uniflorus, and Platanthera flava var. herbiola. Exotic weeds washed in by the river typically include Prunella vulgaris, Anthoxanthum odoratum ssp. odoratum, and Daucus carota. Cover by nonvascular plants is insignificant. Indicator species that help to distinguish this community from others within the herbaceous physiognomy for high-elevation wetlands of the Allegheny Mountains region include Marshallia grandiflora, Juncus dudleyi, Krigia biflora var. biflora, Lysimachia quadrifolia, Phlox maculata, Platanthera flava var. herbiola, Rhododendron arborescens, Sanguisorba canadensis, Triantha glutinosa, and Trautvetteria caroliniensis var. caroliniensis. Mean species richness of vascular plants is 37 taxa per 400 square meters (Byers et al. 2007).
This herbaceous riverscour prairie occurs on temporarily flooded sand and cobbles in the Allegheny Mountains region of West Virginia, at elevations between 1060 and 1100 m. It is a small-patch type that occupies flat to gently sloping islands, cobble bars, and shorelines along high-gradient streams. Ice-scour and flood deposition/scour keep this community open and prevent accumulation of organic material in the substrate. Flooding can occur at any time of year. Shoreline locations probably receive seepage from the adjacent upland forest. Bedrock may be shale or sandstone. The unvegetated surface averages 40% large rocks, 25% small rocks, 20% sand, and 15% bare soil, with a trace amount of litter and woody debris (Byers et al. 2007).
Low
This is a small-patch herbaceous riverscour community. Nutrient cycling occurs primarily from ice-scour, flood scour, and flood deposition.
Authors:
E.A. Byers      Version Date: 03Apr2007


References:
  • Byers, E. A., J. P. Vanderhorst, and B. P. Streets. 2007. Classification and conservation assessment of high elevation wetland communities in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia. West Virginia Natural Heritage Program, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Elkins.
  • Eastern Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Boston, MA.
  • Fike, J. 1999. Terrestrial and palustrine plant communities of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Natural Diversity Inventory. Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Recreation, Bureau of Forestry, Harrisburg, PA. 86 pp.
  • Zimmerman, E. A. 2011u. Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program. Floodplain Scour Community Factsheet. [http://www.naturalheritage.state.pa.us/Community.aspx?=16011[ (accessed February 14, 2012)
  • Zimmerman, E. A., T. Davis, M. A. Furedi, B. Eichelberger, J. McPherson, S. Seymour, G. Podniesinski, N. Dewar, and J. Wagner, editors. 2012. Terrestrial and palustrine plant communities of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Harrisburg. [http://www.naturalheritage.state.pa.us/Communities.aspx]


USNVC Credits: Detailed Description of the National Vegetation Classification Types

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Author(s). publicationYear. Description Title [last revised revisionDate]. United States National Vegetation Classification. Federal Geographic Data Committee, Washington, D.C.

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About this document
This document contains type descriptions at the Association level of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. These descriptions were primarily written by NatureServe ecologists in collaboration with Federal Geographic Data Committee Vegetation Subcommittee and a wide variety of state, federal and private partners as a part of the implementation of the National Vegetation Classification. Formation descriptions were written by the Hierarchy Revisions Working Group. The descriptions are based on consultation with natural resource professionals, published literature, and other vegetation classification systems. The Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification is responsible for managing the review and formal adoption of these types into the National Vegetation Classification. Partners involved in the implementation of the USNVC include:

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Disclaimer:
Given the dynamic nature of the standard, it is possible a type description is incomplete or in revision at the time of download; therefore, users of the data should track the date of access and read the revisions section of the USNVC.org website to understand the current status of the classification. While USNVC data have undergone substantial review prior to posting, it is possible that some errors or inaccuracies have remained undetected.

For information on the process used to develop these descriptions see:

Faber-Langendoen, D., T. Keeler-Wolf, D. Meidinger, D. Tart, B. Hoagland, C. Josse, G. Navarro, S. Ponomarenko, J.-P. Saucier, A. Weakley, P. Comer. 2014. EcoVeg: A new approach to vegetation description and classification. Ecological Monographs 84:533-561 (erratum 85:473).

Franklin, S., D. Faber-Langendoen, M. Jennings, T. Keeler-Wolf, O. Loucks, A. McKerrow, R.K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2012. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification. Annali di Botanica 2: 1-9.

Jennings, M. D., D. Faber-Langendoen, O. L. Louckes, R. K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2009. Standards for associations and alliances of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. Ecological Monographs 79(2):173-199.

FGDC [Federal Geographic Data Committee]. 2008. Vegetation Classification Standard, FGDC-STD-005, Version 2. Washington, DC., USA. [http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/vegetation/NVCS_V2_FINAL_2008-02.pdf]

For additional information contact:

  • Implementation of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification Standard - Alexa McKerrow (amckerrow@usgs.gov)
  • NatureServe's Development of NVC Type Descriptions - Don Faber-Langendoen (don_faber- langendoen@natureserve.org)
  • Ecological Society of America's Review of the Type Descriptions Scott.Franklin@unco.edu
  • Federal Geographic Data Committee - Vegetation Subcommittee's Activities - Marianne Burke (mburke@fs.fed.us)