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CEGL006409 Onoclea sensibilis - (Adiantum pedatum) - Impatiens capensis - Carex plantaginea Seepage Meadow

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence:
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Sensitive Fern - (Northern Maidenhair) - Orange Jewelweed - Plantainleaf Sedge Seepage Meadow
Colloquial Name: Enriched Northern Hardwood Forested Seep
Hierarchy Level: Association
Type Concept: These small seepage wetlands occur as pockets or narrow linear patches within northern hardwood forests where seepage waters create saturated and mineral-rich conditions. Streamheads and lower slopes are typical settings, and the ground surface is usually gently sloping. Though generally shaded by the overhanging forest canopy, this association is defined by the herbaceous vegetation which is distinctly different from the herb and shrub layers in the surrounding forest. Shrub cover is generally low, and herb cover is lush (typically in the range of 60-85%). Bryophytes may be present but are often patchy. Herb composition is variable depending on the nutrient status of the soil and seepage water. Ferns, such as Onoclea sensibilis, Athyrium filix-femina, and Matteuccia struthiopteris, may be prominent. Impatiens capensis and Arisaema triphyllum are typical forb species. On the more enriched sites, Adiantum pedatum, Hydrophyllum virginianum, Impatiens pallida, Milium effusum, Carex platyphylla, and/or Carex plantaginea may be present. Other species commonly recorded from this vegetation are Carex scabrata, Carex debilis, Polystichum acrostichoides, Glyceria striata, Solidago caesia, and Ageratina altissima (= Eupatorium rugosum).
Diagnostic Characteristics: No Data Available
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: This type is supported by plot data from parks in Vermont and New Hampshire. Similar vegetation has been observed elsewhere in the region but not generally documented as distinct. Attention to these forested seeps could provide data to refine their classification and distribution.
Similar NVC Types:
Symplocarpus foetidus - Impatiens capensis Seepage Meadow, note:
Physiognomy and Structure: No Data Available
Floristics: Though generally shaded by the overhanging forest canopy, this association is defined by the herbaceous vegetation which is distinctly different from the herb and shrub layers in the surrounding forest. Shrub cover is generally low, and herb cover is lush (typically in the range of 60-85%). Bryophytes may be present but are often patchy. Herb composition is variable depending on the nutrient status of the soil and seepage water. Ferns, such as Onoclea sensibilis, Athyrium filix-femina, and Matteuccia struthiopteris, may be prominent. Impatiens capensis and Arisaema triphyllum are typical forb species. On the more enriched sites, Adiantum pedatum, Hydrophyllum virginianum, Impatiens pallida, Milium effusum, Carex platyphylla, and/or Carex plantaginea may be present. Other species commonly recorded from this vegetation are Carex scabrata, Carex debilis, Polystichum acrostichoides, Glyceria striata, Solidago caesia, and Ageratina altissima (= Eupatorium rugosum).
Dynamics: No Data Available
Environmental Description: These small seepage wetlands occur as pockets or narrow linear patches within northern hardwood forests where seepage waters create saturated and mineral-rich conditions. Streamheads and lower slopes are typical settings, and the ground surface is usually gently sloping.
Geographic Range: This association ranges across northern New England and New York and is expected to occur in adjacent Canada; its extent southward is unknown.
Nations: CA?, US
States/Provinces: ME, NB?, NH, NY?, QC?, VT
US Forest Service Ecoregions (1994/1995)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Adirondack-New England Mixed Forest - Coniferous Forest - Alpine Meadow Province
Province Code: M212    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: White Mountain Section
Section Code: M212A     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Confidence Level: Low - Poorly Documented
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: G4?
Greasons: Grank has not been evaluated.
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy:
Concept Author(s): S.C. Gawler
Author of Description: S.C. Gawler
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 23Feb2006
References:
  • Eastern Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Boston, MA.
  • Gawler, S. C., and P. S. Bowman. 2012. Vegetation classification and mapping at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, New Hampshire. Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR--2012/584.1. National Park Service, Fort Collins, CO.
  • Sperduto, D. D., and W. F. Nichols. 2004. Natural communities of New Hampshire: A guide and classification. New Hampshire Natural Heritage Bureau, DRED Division of Forests and Lands, Concord. 242 pp.