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CEGL006258 Caltha palustris - Impatiens capensis - Viola cucullata Seepage Meadow

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence:
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Yellow Marsh-marigold - Orange Jewelweed - Marsh Blue Violet Seepage Meadow
Colloquial Name: Central Appalachian Woodland Seep
Hierarchy Level: Association
Type Concept: This community is a saturated, herbaceous, small-patch wetland occurring on relatively steep, usually gravelly or bouldery slopes at sites of groundwater discharge. The type is probably scattered in the northern Blue Ridge and parts of the Ridge and Valley province, in areas underlain by base-rich metamorphic, igneous, or sedimentary rocks. Occurrences are more common at, but not restricted to, elevations above 760 m (2500 feet) elevation. Habitats are typically narrow and partially or wholly shaded by tree species rooted in adjacent upland forests. A few occurrences encompass larger spring seeps that may have resulted from the clearing of forested seepage swamps. Vegetation is similar to the herbaceous component of forested seepage swamps but is usually more forb-rich. Characteristic species include Caltha palustris, Impatiens capensis, Viola cucullata, Chelone glabra, Pilea pumila, Chrysosplenium americanum, Lycopus virginicus, Lycopus uniflorus, Packera aurea (= Senecio aureus), Veratrum viride, Laportea canadensis, and Carex gynandra.
Diagnostic Characteristics: No Data Available
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: This association is highly provisional, and much additional inventory and quantitative data collection are needed before a robust classification can be produced. Some occurrences of this vegetation are natural, while others appear to have resulted from disturbance. Montane seeps are poorly understood and problematic in that most patches fall well below minimum map unit size for vegetation mapping projects. Because of their extremely small, narrow, and linear configuration, they are also difficult to plot-sample without including extraneous vegetation.
Similar NVC Types:
Diphylleia cymosa - Saxifraga micranthidifolia - Laportea canadensis Forested Herbaceous Seep, note: a similar southern Appalachian type.
Impatiens (capensis, pallida) - Monarda didyma - Rudbeckia laciniata var. humilis Herbaceous Seep, note: a similar southern Appalachian type.
Vernonia noveboracensis - Thelypteris palustris - Symplocarpus foetidus Seepage Meadow, note:
Physiognomy and Structure: No Data Available
Floristics: Vegetation is similar to the herbaceous component of forested seepage swamps but is usually more forb-rich. Characteristic species include Caltha palustris, Impatiens capensis, Viola cucullata, Chelone glabra, Pilea pumila, Chrysosplenium americanum, Lycopus virginicus, Lycopus uniflorus, Packera aurea (= Senecio aureus), Veratrum viride, Laportea canadensis, and Carex gynandra.
Dynamics: No Data Available
Environmental Description: This community occupies narrow, relatively steep, usually gravelly or bouldery spring seeps. Underlying bedrock includes base-rich metamorphic and igneous rocks such as Catoctin metabasalt (greenstone) and pyroxene-bearing granites, or calcareous sedimentary rocks. Occurrences are more common at, but not restricted to, elevations above 760 m (2500 feet) elevation. Habitats are typically narrow and partially or wholly shaded by tree species rooted in adjacent upland forests. A few occurrences encompass larger spring seeps that may have resulted from the clearing of forested seepage swamps.
Geographic Range: This community type is probably scattered in the northern Blue Ridge and parts of the Ridge and Valley province, in areas underlain by base-rich metamorphic, igneous, or sedimentary rocks.
Nations: US
States/Provinces: VA
US Forest Service Ecoregions (1994/1995)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Central Appalachian Broadleaf Forest - Coniferous Forest - Meadow Province
Province Code: M221    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Northern Ridge and Valley Section
Section Code: M221A     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Confidence Level: Low - Poorly Documented
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: GNR
Greasons: Insufficient data are currently available to rank this community.
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy: = Caltha palustris - Impatiens capensis - Viola cucullata Herbaceous Vegetation [Provisional] (Young et al. 2007a)
Concept Author(s): G. Fleming
Author of Description: G. Fleming
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 09Aug2004
References:
  • Eastern Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Boston, MA.
  • Fleming, G. P., and K. D. Patterson. 2011a. Natural communities of Virginia: Ecological groups and community types. Natural Heritage Technical Report 11-07. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage, Richmond. 34 pp.
  • Fleming, G. P., P. P. Coulling, K. D. Patterson, and K. Taverna. 2006. The natural communities of Virginia: Classification of ecological community groups. Second approximation. Version 2.2. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage, Richmond. [http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural_heritage/ncTIV.shtml]
  • Young, J., G. Fleming, P. Townsend, and J. Foster. 2006. Vegetation of Shenandoah National Park in relation to environmental gradients. Final Report (v.1.1). Research technical report prepared for USDI, National Park Service. USGS/NPS Vegetation Mapping Program. 92 pp. plus appendices.
  • Young, J., G. Fleming, P. Townsend, and J. Foster. 2007a. Vegetation of Shenandoah National Park in relation to environmental gradients. Final Report, volume 1.1. Unpublished report submitted to the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service. 103 pp. plus appendices and GIS products.
  • Young, J., G. Fleming, W. Cass, and C. Lea. 2009. Vegetation of Shenandoah National Park in relation to environmental gradients, Version 2.0. Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR--2009/142. National Park Service, Philadelphia, PA. 389 pp.