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CEGL000948 Salix amygdaloides / Salix exigua Riparian Woodland

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence:
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Peachleaf Willow / Narrowleaf Willow Riparian Woodland
Colloquial Name:
Hierarchy Level: Association
Type Concept: This association occurs in riparian habitats on the Columbia Plateau in the interior northwest, in the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah, and within Bandelier National Monument in north-central New Mexico. Elevation ranges from 100-1600 m. Stands are located in overflow channels of large rivers, and on narrow floodplains of small creeks. Substrates include a wide range of soil textures with the exception of clay. Soils are classified predominantly as Entisols (Fluvents) or Mollisols (Borolls). The water table is within 1 m of the soil surface during the growing season, and the vegetation is tolerant of prolonged flooding. The ground surface is characterized by shrubs rooted in exposed gravels and sands. This riparian woodland has a moderately open overstory canopy dominated by the small tree Salix amygdaloides with Salix exigua dominating the tall-shrub layer near the shore. Other tree species may include scattered Populus fremontii, Acer negundo, Populus angustifolia, Populus deltoides, and the introduced Elaeagnus angustifolia. Associated shrubs in the moderately dense short-shrub layer include Rhus trilobata and Apocynum cannabinum. The invasive exotic Tamarix ramosissima may present in the tall-shrub layer in disturbed stands. The herbaceous layer is often dominated by graminoids such as Hordeum jubatum, Phalaris arundinacea, Pascopyrum smithii, Eleocharis palustris, and Distichlis spicata, along with forbs such as Maianthemum stellatum, Ambrosia tomentosa, and Iva axillaris. Introduced herbaceous species are present to dominant in many stands and may include Bromus inermis, Cirsium arvense, Lepidium latifolium, Melilotus officinalis, and Poa pratensis.
Diagnostic Characteristics: No Data Available
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: Stands from the Green River in Utah may be different from the stands described from small creeks on the Hanford Site along the Columbia River in Washington.
Similar NVC Types:
Physiognomy and Structure: Tree canopy 5-15 m tall and short shrub 0.5-2 m.
Floristics: This riparian woodland has a moderately open overstory canopy dominated by the small tree Salix amygdaloides with Salix exigua dominating the tall-shrub layer near the shore. Other tree species may include scattered Populus fremontii, Acer negundo, Populus angustifolia, Populus deltoides, and the introduced Elaeagnus angustifolia. Associated shrubs in the moderately dense short-shrub layer may include Apocynum cannabinum and Rhus trilobata. The invasive exotic Tamarix ramosissima may be present in the tall-shrub layer in disturbed stands. The herbaceous layer is often dominated by graminoids such as Distichlis spicata, Eleocharis palustris, Hordeum jubatum, Phalaris arundinacea, and Pascopyrum smithii, along with forbs such as Ambrosia tomentosa, Iva axillaris, and Maianthemum stellatum. Introduced herbaceous species are present to dominant in many stands and may include Bromus inermis, Cirsium arvense, Lepidium latifolium, Melilotus officinalis (= Melilotus albus), and Poa pratensis.
Dynamics: This association is restricted to sites that are temporarily flooded or have a shallow water table.
Environmental Description: This association occurs in riparian habitats on the Columbia Plateau in the interior northwest and in the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah. Elevation ranges from 100-1600 m. It is also known to occur at 1640 m (5370 feet) in elevation along a canyon bottom with low solar exposure within Bandelier National Monument in north-central New Mexico. Stands are located in overflow channels of large rivers, and on narrow floodplains of small creeks. Substrates include a wide range of soil textures with the exception of clay. Soils are classified predominantly as Entisols (Fluvents) or Mollisols (Borolls). The water table is within 1 m of the soil surface during the growing season (Hansen et al. 1995), and the vegetation is tolerant of prolonged flooding. The ground surface is characterized by shrubs rooted in exposed gravels and sands. Adjacent riparian vegetation may include Acer negundo, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, and Populus deltoides woodlands and Schoenoplectus pungens and Typha latifolia herbaceous communities.
Geographic Range: This association occurs in riparian habitats on the Columbia Plateau in the interior northwest, in the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah, and within Bandelier National Monument in north-central New Mexico.
Nations: US
States/Provinces: ID?, NM, OR, UT, WA
US Forest Service Ecoregions (1994/1995)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Southern Rocky Mountain Steppe - Open Woodland - Coniferous Forest - Alpine Meadow Province
Province Code: M331    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Uinta Basin Section
Section Code: 341C     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
US Forest Service Ecoregions (2007)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Southern Rocky Mountain Steppe - Open Woodland - Coniferous Forest - Alpine Meadow Province
Province Code: M331    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Uinta Basin Section
Section Code: 341C     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Confidence Level: Low
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: G1Q
Greasons:
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy: = Salix amygdaloides / Salix exigua Woodland (Von Loh 2000)
= Salix amygdaloides (Evans 1989a) [(p.21)]
Concept Author(s): K.A. Schulz
Author of Description: K.A. Schulz and K.S. King
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 31Mar2009
References:
  • Bourgeron, P. S., and L. D. Engelking, editors. 1994. A preliminary vegetation classification of the western United States. Unpublished report. The Nature Conservancy, Western Heritage Task Force, Boulder, CO. 175 pp. plus appendix.
  • Evans, S. 1989a. Riparian survey of Washington's Columbia Basin. Unpublished report prepared for The Nature Conservancy Washington Natural Heritage Program, Olympia, Washington.
  • Hansen, P. L., R. D. Pfister, K. Boggs, B. J. Cook, J. Joy, and D. K. Hinckley. 1995. Classification and management of Montana's riparian and wetland sites. Miscellaneous Publication No. 54. Montana Forest and Conservation Experiment Station, School of Forestry, University of Montana. 646 pp. plus posters.
  • Hibner, C. D. 2009. Special project soil survey of Bandelier National Monument. Natural Resources Conservation Science. In cooperation with the USDI National Park Service and the New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station. [in review]
  • Hinschberger, M. S. 1978. Occurrence and relative abundance of small mammals associated with riparian and upland habitats along the Columbia River. Unpublished thesis, Oregon State University, Corvallis. 78 pp.
  • IDCDC [Idaho Conservation Data Center]. 2005. Wetland and riparian plant associations in Idaho. Idaho Conservation Data Center, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise. [http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/tech/CDC/ecology/wetland_riparian_assoc.cfm] (accessed 14 June 2005).
  • Kagan, J. S., J. A. Christy, M. P. Murray, and J. A. Titus. 2004. Classification of native vegetation of Oregon. January 2004. Oregon Natural Heritage Information Center, Portland. 52 pp.
  • Muldavin, E., A. Kennedy, C. Jackson, P. Neville, T. Neville, K. Schulz, and M. Reid. 2011b. Vegetation classification and map: Bandelier National Monument. Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SCPN/NRTR--2011/438. National Park Service, Fort Collins, CO.
  • Von Loh, J. 2000. Draft local descriptions of the vegetation associations of Ouray National Wildlife Refuge. USGS Bureau of Reclamation, Remote Sensing and GIS Group, Denver Federal Center, Denver.
  • Von Loh, J., D. Cogan, K. Schulz, D. Crawford, T. Meyer, J. Pennell, and M. Pucherelli. 2002. USGS-USFWS Vegetation Mapping Program, Ouray National Wildlife Refuge, Utah. USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Remote Sensing and GIS Group, Technical Memorandum 8260-02-03. Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO. 225 pp.
  • Western Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Boulder, CO.
  • WNHP [Washington Natural Heritage Program]. 2018. Unpublished data files. Washington Natural Heritage Program, Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA.