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CEGL006567 Symplocarpus foetidus - Impatiens capensis Seepage Meadow

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
Type Concept Sentence:
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Common (Translated Scientific) Name: Skunk-cabbage - Orange Jewelweed Seepage Meadow
Colloquial Name: Skunk-cabbage - Orange Jewelweed Seep
Hierarchy Level: Association
Type Concept: This small seepage wetland vegetation occurs in low-lying areas such as streamheads, lower slope drainages, and the borders of small streams where groundwater emerges. The substrate is mucky, with rocks and boulders often visibly protruding above the surface. Little quantitative data exist for this vegetation, although it appears to be quite common in the northeastern United States. Typically, this vegetation is shaded by tree species of higher ground and surrounding edges of the community, but these species are not characteristic of the vegetation and vary widely among occurrences. Lindera benzoin may occur, particularly at the edges. Characteristic herbaceous species are Symplocarpus foetidus, Impatiens capensis, and Arisaema triphyllum. Other common associates are variable but may include Veratrum viride, Pilea pumila, Cardamine pensylvanica, Saxifraga pensylvanica, Carex canescens, Caltha palustris, and Viola sororia.
Diagnostic Characteristics: No Data Available
Rationale for Nominal Species or Physiognomic Features:
Classification Comments: No Data Available
Similar NVC Types:
Symplocarpus foetidus - Mixed Forbs Seep, note:
Chrysosplenium americanum Seepage Meadow, note:
Onoclea sensibilis - (Adiantum pedatum) - Impatiens capensis - Carex plantaginea Seepage Meadow, note:
Vernonia noveboracensis - Thelypteris palustris - Symplocarpus foetidus Seepage Meadow, note:
Physiognomy and Structure: No Data Available
Floristics: Characteristic herbaceous species are Symplocarpus foetidus, Impatiens capensis, and Arisaema triphyllum. Other common associates are variable but may include Veratrum viride, Pilea pumila, Cardamine pensylvanica, Saxifraga pensylvanica, Carex canescens, Caltha palustris, and Viola sororia.
Dynamics: No Data Available
Environmental Description: This small seepage wetland vegetation occurs in low-lying areas such as streamheads, lower slope drainages, and the borders of small streams where groundwater emerges. The substrate is mucky, with rocks and boulders often visibly protruding above the surface.
Geographic Range: This vegetation occurs in the northeastern United States.
Nations: US
States/Provinces: CT, DC, MA, MD?, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, WV
US Forest Service Ecoregions (1994/1995)
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name: Eastern Broadleaf Forest (Oceanic) Province
Province Code: 221    Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Section Name: Lower New England Section
Section Code: 221A     Occurrence Status: Confident or certain
Omernik Ecoregions:
Confidence Level: Low
Confidence Level Comments:
Grank: GNR
Greasons:
Concept Lineage:
Predecessors:
Obsolete Names:
Obsolete Parents:
Synonomy: = Symplocarpus foetidus - Impatiens capensis Herbaceous Vegetation (Vanderhorst and Streets 2006)
< Stream Thicket community (Ehrenfeld 1977)
Concept Author(s): Eastern Ecology Group
Author of Description: L.A. Sneddon
Acknowledgements:
Version Date: 05Jun2006
References:
  • Eastern Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Boston, MA.
  • Edinger, G. J., A. L. Feldmann, T. G. Howard, J. J. Schmid, F. C. Sechler, E. Eastman, E. Largay, and L. A. Sneddon. 2007. Vegetation classification and mapping of vegetation at Saratoga National Historical Park. Draft Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR--XXXX/XXX. National Park Service, Northeast Region, Coastal Institute in Kingston, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI.
  • Edinger, G. J., D. J. Evans, S. Gebauer, T. G. Howard, D. M. Hunt, and A. M. Olivero, editors. 2002. Ecological communities of New York state. Second edition. A revised and expanded edition of Carol Reschke's ecological communities of New York state. (Draft for review). New York Natural Heritage Program, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY.
  • Edinger, G. J., D. J. Evans, S. Gebauer, T. G. Howard, D. M. Hunt, and A. M. Olivero, editors. 2014. Ecological communities of New York state. Second edition. A revised and expanded edition of Carol Reschke's ecological communities of New York state. New York Natural Heritage Program, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY.
  • Ehrenfeld, J. G. 1977. Vegetation of Morristown National Historical Park: Ecological analysis and management alternatives. Final Report. USDI National Park Service Contract No. 1600-7-0004. 166 pp.
  • Largay, E. F., and L. A. Sneddon. 2008. Vegetation classification and mapping at Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site. Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR--2008/123. National Park Service, Philadelphia, PA. 111 pp.
  • McPherson, J. 2011c. Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program. Skunk-cabbage - Golden Saxifrage Seep Factsheet. [http://www.naturalheritage.state.pa.us/Community.aspx?=16013] (accessed February 13, 2012)
  • MNNHP [Minnesota Natural Heritage Program]. 1993. Minnesota's native vegetation: A key to natural communities. Version 1.5. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Natural Heritage Program, St. Paul, MN. 110 pp.
  • NRCS [Natural Resources Conservation Service]. 2004a. Soil survey of Saratoga County, New York. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. 590 pp.
  • Sneddon, L., R. E. Zaremba, E. Largay, G. Podniesinski, S. Perles, and J. Thompson. 2008. Vegetation classification and mapping of Morristown National Historical Park, New Jersey. Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR--2008/116. National Park Service, Philadelphia, PA. 162 pp. [http://biology.usgs.gov/npsveg/morr/morrrpt.pdf]
  • Vanderhorst, J., and B. P. Streets. 2006. Vegetation classification and mapping of Camp Dawson Army Training Site, West Virginia: Second approximation. Natural Heritage Program, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Elkins. 83 pp.
  • Zimmerman, E. A., T. Davis, M. A. Furedi, B. Eichelberger, J. McPherson, S. Seymour, G. Podniesinski, N. Dewar, and J. Wagner, editors. 2012. Terrestrial and palustrine plant communities of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Harrisburg. [http://www.naturalheritage.state.pa.us/Communities.aspx]