Invalid Unit Specified
Association Detail Report: CEGL007364
Quercus phellos - Quercus alba / Vaccinium fuscatum - (Viburnum nudum) / Carex barrattii Wet Forest

The U.S. National
Vegetation Classification
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Translated Name:Willow Oak - White Oak / Black Highbush Blueberry - (Possumhaw) / Barratt's Sedge Wet Forest
Colloquial Name:Highland Rim Barrens Depression Willow Oak Forest
This association encompasses forests of poorly drained shallow upland depressions on very flat landscapes of loess soils overlying Fort Payne Formation cherty limestone in the Eastern Highland Rim of Tennessee. These shallow depressions, often found at streamheads, are seasonally wet (mostly during winter and early spring) with a shallow, perched water table but tend to be dry in late summer and early fall. The canopy is dominated by Quercus phellos and Quercus nigra, and Quercus alba in varying amounts depending on position. Also present are Liquidambar styraciflua, Acer rubrum var. trilobum, and Nyssa sylvatica. The subcanopy is composed of the canopy species, with Acer rubrum var. trilobum being the most prominent. The shrub stratum is characteristically dense (ranging from 20-90% cover in a 20x20-m plot), with Vaccinium fuscatum, Viburnum nudum var. nudum, Photinia pyrifolia (= Aronia arbutifolia), Rhododendron canescens, and Hypericum hypericoides. Herbaceous density and diversity are largely regulated by the duration and depth of seasonal flooding and summer drought. The herb layer typically contains Carex spp. (Carex joorii, Carex debilis, Carex intumescens, Carex caroliniana, Carex complanata), including the disjunct Carex barrattii in some examples. Also found are Osmunda cinnamomea, Osmunda regalis var. spectabilis, Thelypteris noveboracensis, Chimaphila maculata, and Mitchella repens. Polytrichum commune and Sphagnum spp. are common.
No Data Available
Vegetation Hierarchy
Name:Database Code:Classification Code:
Class 1 Forest & Woodland C01 1
Subclass 1.B Temperate & Boreal Forest & Woodland S15 1.B
Formation 1.B.3 Temperate Flooded & Swamp Forest F026 1.B.3
Division 1.B.3.Na Eastern North American-Great Plains Flooded & Swamp Forest D011 1.B.3.Na
Macrogroup M503 Central Hardwood Swamp Forest M503 1.B.3.Na.2
Group G654 South-Central Flatwoods & Pond Forest G654 1.B.3.Na.2.b
Alliance A1996 White Oak Wet Depression & Pond Forest A1996
Association CEGL007364 Highland Rim Barrens Depression Willow Oak Forest CEGL007364
This community is likely endemic to the Eastern Highland Rim of Coffee and adjacent counties, Tennessee. It is not found in Kentucky.
Synonomy: = Quercus phellos - Quercus alba / Vaccinium fuscatum - (Viburnum nudum) / Carex (barrattii, intumescens) Forest (TNC 1998a)

Related Type Name:

Short Citation:
  • Pyne 1994
  • Pyne 2000
  • Southeastern Ecology Working Group n.d.
  • TDNH unpubl. data
  • TNC 1998a
States/Provinces:TN
Nations:US
Range:This wetland forest type is restricted to The Barrens of Tennessee's southeastern Highland Rim. This area (the "Sango" polygon TN48 in STATSGO) comprises about 1250 square km (Pyne 2000).
US Forest Service Ecoregions
Domain Name:
Division Name:
Province Name:Eastern Broadleaf Forest (Continental) Province
Province Code:222   Occurrence Status:Confident or certain
Section Name:Interior Low Plateau, Highland Rim Section
Section Code:222E     Occurrence Status:Confident or certain
No Data Available
The canopy is dominated by Quercus phellos and Quercus nigra, and Quercus alba in varying amounts depending on position. Also present are Liquidambar styraciflua, Acer rubrum var. trilobum, and Nyssa sylvatica. The subcanopy is composed of the canopy species, with Acer rubrum var. trilobum being the most prominent. The shrub stratum is characteristically dense (ranging from 20-90% cover in a 20x20-m plot), with Vaccinium fuscatum, Viburnum nudum var. nudum, Photinia pyrifolia (= Aronia arbutifolia), Rhododendron canescens, and Hypericum hypericoides. Herbaceous density and diversity are largely regulated by the duration and depth of seasonal flooding and summer drought. The herb layer typically contains Carex spp. (Carex joorii, Carex debilis, Carex intumescens, Carex caroliniana, Carex complanata), including the disjunct Carex barrattii in some examples. Also found are Osmunda cinnamomea, Osmunda regalis var. spectabilis, Thelypteris noveboracensis, Chimaphila maculata, and Mitchella repens. Polytrichum commune and Sphagnum spp. are common. Two variants of this association exist at Arnold Air Force Base. The first occurs on somewhat drier sites or on the outer borders of the depressions. The canopy is dominated by Quercus alba, with or without Quercus phellos and Quercus nigra. Oxydendrum arboreum is a common subcanopy species. The tall-shrub stratum includes more Rhododendron canescens and Vaccinium fuscatum than Viburnum nudum. This variant tends to have a denser herbaceous layer with higher diversity and commonly includes the aforementioned species along with Bartonia virginica, Chasmanthium laxum, and Chasmanthium sessiliflorum. The second variant of this community is found along Hunt Creek in the northern section of Arnold Air Force Base. Its canopy is dominated by Quercus palustris and Quercus pagoda. Liquidambar styraciflua is prominent in the subcanopy; its prominence is likely due to past logging in the vicinity. The shrub and herbaceous layers include the above species in addition to Cornus foemina and Triadenum walteri.
This wetland forest association is found in poorly drained shallow upland depressions on very flat landscapes of loess soils overlying Fort Payne Formation cherty limestone in the Eastern Highland Rim of Tennessee. These shallow depressions, often found at streamheads, are seasonally wet (mostly during winter and early spring) with a shallow, perched water table but tend to be dry in late summer and early fall.
Low - Poorly Documented
These poorly drained upland flats or shallow depressions on loess overlying Fort Payne Formation cherty limestone are seasonally wet (mostly during winter and early spring) with a shallow, perched water table but tend to be dry in late summer and early fall.
Authors:
M. Pyne and A.S. Weakley      Version Date: 01Feb1995


References:
  • Pyne, M. 1994. Tennessee natural communities. Unpublished document. Tennessee Department of Conservation, Ecology Service Division, Nashville. 7 pp.
  • Pyne, M. 2000. Biogeographic study of The Barrens of the southeastern Highland Rim of Tennessee. Revised final draft to Arnold Engineering Development Center, Arnold Air Force Base. Southeast Community Ecology Group, Association of Biodiversity Information, Durham, NC.
  • Southeastern Ecology Working Group of NatureServe. No date. International Ecological Classification Standard: International Vegetation Classification. Terrestrial Vegetation. NatureServe, Durham, NC.
  • TDNH [Tennessee Division of Natural Heritage]. No date. Unpublished data. Tennessee Division of Natural Heritage, Nashville, TN.
  • TNC [The Nature Conservancy]. 1998a. An investigation and assessment of the vegetation of Arnold Air Force Base. Coffee and Franklin counties, Tennessee. The Nature Conservancy, Tennessee Field Office, Nashville. 37 pp. plus appendices.


USNVC Credits: Detailed Description of the National Vegetation Classification Types

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Author(s). publicationYear. Description Title [last revised revisionDate]. United States National Vegetation Classification. Federal Geographic Data Committee, Washington, D.C.

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About this document
This document contains type descriptions at the Association level of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. These descriptions were primarily written by NatureServe ecologists in collaboration with Federal Geographic Data Committee Vegetation Subcommittee and a wide variety of state, federal and private partners as a part of the implementation of the National Vegetation Classification. Formation descriptions were written by the Hierarchy Revisions Working Group. The descriptions are based on consultation with natural resource professionals, published literature, and other vegetation classification systems. The Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification is responsible for managing the review and formal adoption of these types into the National Vegetation Classification. Partners involved in the implementation of the USNVC include:

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Disclaimer:
Given the dynamic nature of the standard, it is possible a type description is incomplete or in revision at the time of download; therefore, users of the data should track the date of access and read the revisions section of the USNVC.org website to understand the current status of the classification. While USNVC data have undergone substantial review prior to posting, it is possible that some errors or inaccuracies have remained undetected.

For information on the process used to develop these descriptions see:

Faber-Langendoen, D., T. Keeler-Wolf, D. Meidinger, D. Tart, B. Hoagland, C. Josse, G. Navarro, S. Ponomarenko, J.-P. Saucier, A. Weakley, P. Comer. 2014. EcoVeg: A new approach to vegetation description and classification. Ecological Monographs 84:533-561 (erratum 85:473).

Franklin, S., D. Faber-Langendoen, M. Jennings, T. Keeler-Wolf, O. Loucks, A. McKerrow, R.K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2012. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification. Annali di Botanica 2: 1-9.

Jennings, M. D., D. Faber-Langendoen, O. L. Louckes, R. K. Peet, and D. Roberts. 2009. Standards for associations and alliances of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification. Ecological Monographs 79(2):173-199.

FGDC [Federal Geographic Data Committee]. 2008. Vegetation Classification Standard, FGDC-STD-005, Version 2. Washington, DC., USA. [http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/vegetation/NVCS_V2_FINAL_2008-02.pdf]

For additional information contact:

  • Implementation of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification Standard - Alexa McKerrow (amckerrow@usgs.gov)
  • NatureServe's Development of NVC Type Descriptions - Don Faber-Langendoen (don_faber- langendoen@natureserve.org)
  • Ecological Society of America's Review of the Type Descriptions Scott.Franklin@unco.edu
  • Federal Geographic Data Committee - Vegetation Subcommittee's Activities - Marianne Burke (mburke@fs.fed.us)