Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program: Oregon
Education, Research and Technical Assistance for Managing Our Natural Resources

Oregon Project


Assessing the value of prior and novel information in managing a mixed-stock recreational Chinook Salmon fishery

June 2017 - June 2021


Personnel

Participating Agencies

  • Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Processing angler catch for stock identification

Mixed-stock fisheries are systems that consist of multiple populations of fish with sizes amenable to resource management and are harvested simultaneously. When different stocks have varying levels of abundance, productivity, and vulnerability to fishing pressure, fishery managers often are faced with the competing objectives of protecting the more vulnerable stocks while maximizing sustainable harvest on remaining healthy stocks. The challenges associated with managing a mixed-stock fishery are typified by the Columbia River fall-run Chinook fishery at the mouth. The fishery includes numerous fall-run stocks with eight separate fall-run management components, including two protected stocks: Snake River wild brights and Lower Columbia River tules. The recreational fishery is an important economic benefit to the surrounding communities, generating over $25M/year depending on season length.To further complicate the management, a growing number of the recreational anglers believe that they can identify tule Chinook from upriver brights and purport to release an unknown portion of their catch (those identified as tules) to ensure that the season is open as long as possible. Thus, management of the fishery requires reliable estimates of in-season harvest, while taking into account changes in angler behavior. Our objectives are to develop the tools (including novel assessment methods and regulatory options) and systemic understanding necessary to promote effective management of the mixed-stock fishery in the face of existing conservation priorities and changing angler behavior.

Presentations Presentation Date
Jensen, A, C.B. Schreck, S. Bohn, K. O’Malley, J.T. Peterson. 2019. A story of tags, fins, and simulations: How integrating genetics in creel surveys can improve decision making. 55th Annual Meeting of the Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, March 4-8, Bend, OR. 2019-03-03
Jensen, A. and J. Peterson. 2020. What can creel data tell us about angling behavior in a recreational salmon fishery? Annual Meeting of the Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, March 4-6, Bend, OR. 2020-03-06
Jensen, A., C. Schreck, and J.T. Peterson. 2019. Novel Chinook salmon stock discrimination in recreational fishery management. Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society, Reno NV. 2019-09-30